Our Second Battalion: The Accurate and Authentic History of the Second Battalion 111th Infantry

Front Cover
Second Battlion Book Company, 1920 - World War, 1914-1918 - 299 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is an almost day to day diary of the 111th Battalion of infantry in the 28th Infantry in WW1 (The Great War). It starts with the training in the States prior to being deployed to France. It tracks their trip on the Olympia cruise ship (including when it rammed a German Sub (the only cruise ship to ever sink a Submarine). It then goes on the day to day movements and battles of the 111th until the end of the War. It includes the names of all of the members and the day to day casualties encountered. It is a great historical record of the Battalion and of the Major battles of the Great War. Highly recommend this book. 

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 273 - We have paid for our success in the lives of many of our brave comrades. We shall cherish their memory always, and claim for our history and literature their bravery, achievement, and sacrifice.
Page 273 - July 15, it struck again to destroy in one great battle the brave men opposed to it and to enforce its brutal will upon the world and civilization. "Three days later, in conjunction with our Allies, you counter-attacked. The Allied armies gained a brilliant victory that marks the turning point of the war. You did more than to give the Allies the support to which as a nation our faith was pledged.
Page 279 - It is with a sense of gratitude for its splendid accomplishment, which will live through all history, that I record in General Orders a tribute to the victory of the First Army in the Meuse-Argonne battle. Tested and strengthened by the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient, for more than six weeks you battered against the pivot of the enemy line on the western front. It was a position of imposing natural strength, stretching on both sides of the Meuse River from the bitterly contested hills of Verdun...
Page 271 - To attack him is to vanquish him. American Comrades! I am grateful to you for the blood so generously spilled on the soil of my Country. I am proud to have commanded you during such days and to have fought with you for the deliverance of the world.
Page 280 - French colonial divisions — yoni will be long remembered for the stubborn persistence of your progress, your storming of obstinately defended machine gun nests, your penetration, yard by yard, of woods and ravines, your heroic resistance in the face of counter-attacks supported by powerful artillery fire. For more than a month, from the initial attack of September 26th, you fought your way slowly through the Argonne, through the woods and over hills west of the Meuse; you slowly enlarged your hold...
Page 280 - ... six weeks you battered against the pivot of the enemy line on the western front. It was a position of imposing natural strength, stretching on both sides of the Meuse River from the bitterly contested hills of Verdun to the almost impenetrable forest of the Argonne; a position, moreover, fortified by four years of labor designed to render it impregnable; a position held with the fullest resources of the enemy.
Page 281 - Army which is scarcely to be equalled in American history, must remain a source of proud satisfaction to the troops who participated in the last campaign of the war. The American people will remember it as the realization of the hitherto potential strength of the American contribution toward the cause to which they had sworn allegiance. There can be no greater reward for a soldier or for a soldier's memory. This order will be read to all organizations at the first assembly formation after its receipt.
Page 273 - Three days later, in conjunction with our Allies, you counter-attacked. The Allied Armies gained a brilliant victory that marks the turning point of the war. You did more than give our brave Allies the support to which as a nation our faith was pledged. You proved that our altruism, our pacific spirit, our sense of justice have not blunted our virility or our courage. You have shown that American initiative and energy are as fit for the test of war as for the pursuits of peace. You have justly won...
Page 211 - For distinguished and exceptional gallantry at Chateau Thierry on July 15, 1918 in the operations of the American Expeditionary Forces. In testimony thereof and as an expression of appreciation of his valor I award him this citation.
Page 271 - Your magnificent courage completely routed a surprised enemy and your indomitable tenacity checked the counter-attacks of his fresh divisions. You have shown yourselves worthy Sons of your Great Country and you were admired by your brothers in arms.

Bibliographic information