The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of Mr. Steeven's [!] Last Edition, with a Selection of the Most Important Notes ...

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G. Fleischer, 1807
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Page 65 - NOW entertain conjecture of a time When creeping murmur and the poring dark Fills the wide vessel of the universe. From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night, The hum of either army stilly sounds, That the fix'd sentinels almost receive The secret .whispers of each other's watch. Fire answers fire ; and through their paly flames Each battle sees the other's umber
Page 41 - Be copy now to men of grosser blood, And teach them how to war! — And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, shew us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are -worth your breeding : -which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
Page 67 - There is some soul of goodness in things evil, Would men observingly distil it out ; For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers, Which is both healthful and good husbandry.
Page 233 - tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings, Carry them here and there ; jumping o'er times ; Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass...
Page 81 - This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered, — We few, we happy few, we band of brothers...
Page 41 - ... grosser blood, And teach them how to war! — And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding : which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,* Straining upon the start. The game's afoot ; Follow your spirit : and, upon this charge, Cry — God for Harry ! England ! and Saint George ! [Exeunt . Alarum,...
Page 15 - Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds; Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor; Who, busied in his majesty, surveys The singing masons building roofs of gold, The civil citizens kneading up the honey, The poor mechanic porters crowding in Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate, The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,...
Page 41 - O'erhang and jutty his confounded base, Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean. Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide, Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit To his full height.
Page 82 - We few, we happy few, we band of brothers ; For he, to-day that sheds his blood with me, Shall be my brother ; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition* : And gentlemen in England, now a-bed, Shall think themselves accurs'd, they were not here ; And hold their manhoods cheap, while any speaks, That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
Page 74 - Must kings neglect that private men enjoy! And what have kings that privates have not too, Save ceremony— save general ceremony?

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