The Story of Worcester, Massachusetts

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Little, Brown,, 1910 - Worcester (Mass.) - 159 pages
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The same Isaih Thomas picture is in the book 3 times in the first few pages. What intrigues me...is that a woman's leg, with hot pink (undies??) Did someone proofread this? Also, page 1 is missing....

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Page 93 - The lesson which I have learned in life, which is impressed on me daily, and more deeply as I grow old, is the lesson of Good Will and Good Hope. I believe that to-day is better than yesterday, and that to-morrow will be better than to-day.
Page 30 - ... town ; we said it was very indifferent to us whether they did or not, tho' we thought very differently ; however, as we imagined we had staid long enough in that town, we resolved to set off at day-break the next morning and get to Framingham ; accordingly off we set, after getting some roast beef and brandy from our landlord, which was very necessary on a long march, and prevented us going into houses where perhaps they might be too inquisitive ; we took a road we had not come, and that led...
Page 42 - ... deserters and dispersed men from their ranks, but it is known to be very great. / '** " Our loss has been especially severe in officers, twenty-eight having been killed upon the field. We have to lament the death of Captain George Lincoln, assistant adjutant-general, serving in the staff of General Wool — a young officer of high bearing and approved gallantry, who fell early in the action.
Page 71 - The design of the normal schools is strictly professional ; that is, to prepare, in the best possible manner, the pupils for the work of organizing, governing and teaching the public schools of the Commonwealth. "To this end,' there must be the most thorough knowledge, first, of the branches of learning required to be taught in the schools ; second, of the best methods of teaching those branches ; and, third, of right mental training.
Page 102 - ... who desire no other to bow the neck or bend the knee to them. I believe that the God who created this world has ordained that his children may work out their own salvation and that his nations may work out their own salvation by obedience to his laws without any dictation or coercion from any other. I believe that liberty, good government, free institutions, cannot be given by any one people to any other, but must be wrought out for each by itself, slowly, painfully, in the process of years or...
Page 10 - Council of our present great distress, we being so remote from any succour, (it being between sixty and seventy miles from us to Boston, where the Council useth to sit) and fearing our ammunition would not last long to withstand them, if they continued so to assault us, I spake to Ephraim Curtis to adventure forth again on that service, and to attempt it on foot, as the way wherein there was most hope of getting away undiscovered ; he readily assented, and accordingly went out, but there were so...
Page 102 - I have no faith in fatalism, in destiny, in blind force. I believe in God, the living God, in the American people, a free and brave people, who do not bow the neck or bend the knee to any other, and who desire no other to bow the neck or bend the knee to them.
Page 10 - ... present Condition. When they came to the further end of the Town they saw the Enemy Rifling of houses which the Inhabitants had forsaken. The Post fired upon them, and immediately returned to us again, they discerning no safety in going forward, and being desirous to inform us of the Enemies Actings, that we might the more prepare for a sudden Assault by them. Which indeed presently followed, for as soon as the said Post was come back to us, the Barbarous Heathen pressed upon us in the house...
Page 12 - Indians every where thereabouts, that he could not pass, without apparent hazard of life, so he came back again, but towards morning the said Ephraim adventured forth the third time, and was fain to creep on his hands and knees for some space of ground, that he might not be discerned by the enemy, who waited to prevent our sending if they could have hindered it. But through God's mercy he escaped their hands, and got ' safely to Marlborough, though very much spent, and ready to faint by reason of...
Page 10 - Hosts wrought very graciously for us, in preserving our bodies both within and without the house from their shot, and our house from being consumed by fire, we had but two men wounded in that attempt of theirs, but we apprehended that we killed divers of our enemies. I being desirous to hasten intelligence to the...

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