Kingship and Ideology in the Islamic and Mongol Worlds

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 3, 2008 - History - 232 pages
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What were the attitudes to diplomacy and kingship in the medieval Islamic world? Anne Broadbridge examines struggles over ideology in the Middle East and Central Asia from 1260 to 1405. She explores two very different ideological worlds: the Islamic world of the Mamluk Sultans of Egypt and Syria, and the Mongol world inhabited by the Golden Horde in Central Asia, the Ilkhanids in Iran and Anatolia, the Ilkhanids' successors, and Temür. The relationships among these rival rulers were often highly charged, and diplomatic missions were exchanged in an effort to promote each ruler's ideology. This was the first book to explore what it meant to be a monarch in the pre-modern Islamic world, and how ideas about sovereignty evolved across the period. This groundbreaking work will appeal to scholars of Middle Eastern and Central Asian history, Mongol history, and Islamic history, as well as historians of diplomacy and ideology.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The ideologies and the diplomacy
6
The establishment of ideologies 12601293658693
27
The age of Ilkhanid conversion 12951316694716
64
The age of patronage and Muslim supremacy 13171341717741
99
Mamluk regional sovereignty and the postIlkhanid order 13351382736784
138
The Temürid invasions and the destruction of Mamluk sovereignty 13821404784807
168
Epilogue
198
Bibliography
208
Index
222
Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization
233
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About the author (2008)

Anne F. Broabrdige is Assistant Professor in History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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