Cyberpsychology: An Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 14, 2017 - Business & Economics - 544 pages
This textbook provides a comprehensive overview of the human-computer interface in clear, non-technical language, making it an ideal introduction for students of both psychology and computer science. Covering the past, present, and future developments in technology and psychology, it combines cutting-edge academic research with engaging illustrations and examples that show students how the material relates to their lives. Topics addressed include: human factors of input devices, and the basics of sensation and perception; memory and cognitive issues of users navigating their way through interfaces; communication via programming languages and natural speech interaction; cyberpathologies such as techno-stress and Internet addiction disorders; and challenges surrounding automation and artificial intelligence. This thoroughly updated second edition features new chapters on virtual reality and cybersecurity; expanded coverage of social media, mobile computing, e-learning, and video games; and end-of-chapter review questions that ensure students have mastered key objectives.
 

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Contents

1
5
Two
37
Three
67
Four
97
Five
125
Six
159
Computer literacy was the term once used in schools to refer to
164
Seven
175
Twelve
312
Thirteen
347
Fourteen
385
Fifteen
412
Sixteen
432
Seventeen
459
As indicated in the previous scenarios and the second one from Chapter
460
Eighteen
480

Eight
200
Nine
228
Ten
253
Contents
256
Eleven
286
Contents
483
Nineteen
509
Cybersecurity is both a new issue and an old one in the history of compu
510
Index
532
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Kent Norman is Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the Laboratory for Automation Psychology and Decision Processes at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is a founding member of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory in the College of Information Studies. He is the author or coauthor of more than eighty journal articles and book chapters, and his research has been funded by organizations such as the United States Census Bureau and the National Science Foundation. He developed HyperCourseware(TM), a web-based prototype, and coauthored the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction (QUIS(TM)), a tool to assess users' subjective satisfaction with specific aspects of the human-computer interface.

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