To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography

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Wipf and Stock Publishers, Nov 1, 2007 - Religion - 390 pages
This new edition of Daniel Berrigan's classic autobiography To Dwell in Peace, with a new afterword by the author, takes us through his childhood in Syracuse; his early years as a Jesuit, teacher, priest, and poet; his bold 1968 Catonsville Nine action, when he poured homemade napalm on draft files in opposition to the U.S. war on Vietnam; and his ongoing civil disobedience, which led to his going underground and subsequent two-year imprisonment. We read of friends like Thomas Merton, Dorothy Day, William Stringfellow, and his brother Philip Berrigan, with whom he participated again in the 1980 Plowshares Eight disarmament action. Daniel Berrigan's breathtaking story and the poetic way he tells it inspire and challenge us to resist war, pursue nuclear disarmament, and undertake a similar journey to peace, hope, and justice.
 

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To dwell in peace: an autobiography

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With humility, deep insight, and poetic sensitivity of perception and expression, Berrigan gives the story of his life. He describes his early years as the fifth of six sons, his entrance into the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The Wolf and the Child
5
Moving East
21
The Father
40
The Workhouse
45
The Jesuits for Life
79
Year One of My Life
116
Brothers in Exile
175
Lights on in the House of the Dead
259
Trial and Error
267
The Healer
272
Ground of Contention
280
Swords into Plowshares
290
The Foundering of Academe
294
The Dream the Awakening
308
Toward Life
331

Poison in the Ivy
186
The Fires of Pentecost
215
Underground
241
Epilogue
344
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Daniel Berrigan is an internationally known voice for peace and disarmament. A Jesuit priest, award-winning poet, and the author of over fifty books, he has spoken for peace, justice, and nuclear disarmament for nearly fifty years. He spent several years in prison for his part in the 1968 Catonsville Nine antiwar action and later acted with the Plowshares Eight. Nominated many times for the Nobel Peace Prize, he lives and works in New York City.

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