Cane

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Modern Library, May 1, 1994 - Fiction - 165 pages
7 Reviews
"[Cane] has been reverberating in me to an astonishing degree. I love it passionately; could not possibly exist without it." -Alice Walker

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kara.shamy - LibraryThing

I had never heard of Jean Toomer until my junior year of college when I took a seminar on the Harlem Renaissance. I hardly remember the book itself -- what I do remember was being struck by the sense ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AlCracka - LibraryThing

A wonderful, magisterial voice - at its best, up there with Whitman - but young and unfinished. It has that explosive, tightrope feel of some early works by brilliant writers. It's known as the first ... Read full review

Contents

Karintha
3
Song of the Son
17
Conversion
37
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Jean Toomer is known today for the one successful book of his career, the novel Cane, published in 1923. Based in part upon his brief experience in the South as a school teacher, Cane was perhaps the first genuinely experimental novel by an African American writer responding to the liberating form of modernist narrative techniques as well as to the deepest and most primal roots of black folk culture in both the South and the North. As such, it reflects in its form the identity conflict that the novel's interwoven stories and poems address. Cane is unique for its blend of poetic language and psychological and moral realism; it established Toomer as one of the leading figures of the Harlem Renaissance. However, Toomer soon was absorbed in his own spiritual education. He eventually became a Quaker and spent most of the last part of his life in seclusion.

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