Memoranda

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Fleet and Bishop, 1879
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Page 64 - Now cracks a noble heart. — Good night, sweet prince ; And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest ! Why does the drum come hither?
Page 65 - From women's eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire ; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world...
Page 1 - The Whole Contention betweene the two Famous Houses, Lancaster and Yorke. With the Tragicall ends of the good Duke Humfrey, Richard Duke of Yorke, and King Henrie the sixt. Diuided into two Parts : And newly corrected and enlarged. Written by William Shakespeare, Gent. Printed at London, for TP" A small quarto, containing 64 leaves, A to Q in fours.
Page 25 - A Midsommer nights dreame. As it hath beene sundry times publickely acted, by the Right honourable, the Lord Chamberlaine his seruants. Written by William Shakespeare. Imprinted at London, for Thomas Fisher, and are to be soulde at his shoppe, at the Signe of the White Hart, in Fleetestreete, 1600.
Page 78 - The First and Second Part of The Troublesome Raigne of John King of England. With The Discouerie of King Richard Cordelions base Sonne. (Vulgarly named, the Bastard Fawconbridge :) Also The Death of King John at Swinstead Abbey. As they were (sundry times) lately acted by the Queenes Majesties Players. Written by W. Sh.
Page 4 - The true Tragedie of Richard Duke of Yorke, and the death of good King Henrie the Sixt, with the whole contention betweene the two Houses Lancaster and Yorke, as it was sundrie times acted by the Right Honourable the Earle of Pembrooke his seruants.
Page 24 - Quince, say what the play treats on; then read the names of the actors; and so grow to a point. Quin. Marry, our play is 'The most lamentable comedy, and most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisbe'.
Page 23 - Such a wicked imagination was determined and attempted by a most unkind gentleman, the most adorned creature that ever your Majestie made." The latter part of the Queen's rejoinder is more significant than intelligible : " He that will forget God will also forget his benefactors. This tragedy was played fourtie times in open streets and houses.
Page 67 - I have been told by some anciently conversant with the stage, that it was not originally his, but brought by a private author to be acted, and he only gave some master-touches to one or two of the principal parts or characters...

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