The Olive Tree and Its Products: And the Suitability of the Soil and Climate of California for Its Extensive and Profitable Cultivation

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Dewey & Company, 1881 - Olive - 15 pages
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Page 7 - ... editions of his famous work on fruit, recognizes the great value of the olive, and says : " In the south of Europe it is more valuable than bread, as, to say nothing of its wholescmeness, it enters into every kind of cookery, and renders so large a quantity of vegetable food fit for use. A few olive trees serve for the support of an entire family, who would starve on what otherwise could be raised...
Page 7 - it delights in a stony soil, and thrives even on the sides and tops of rocky hills where there is scarcely any earth ; hence the expression in the Bible, "oil out of the flinty rock.
Page 7 - ... variety of soil, but it shuns a redundancy of moisture, and prefers loose calcareous fertile lands mingled with stones, such as the territory of Attica and the south of France. The quality of its fruit is essentially affected by that of the soil. It succeeds in good loam capable of bearing wheat, but in fat lands it yields oil of an inferior flavor, and becomes laden with a barren exuberance of leaves and branches. The temperature of the climate is a consideration of more importance than the...
Page 11 - ... considered advantageous to put down a spadeful of sea sand obtained from near low-water mark." GATHERING FRUIT. In gathering the olives when quite ripe (in October or November in this State), the Portuguese spread tarpaulins, canvas, etc., around the root of the tree, and then thresh off the berries with long light sticks. This seems to do the tree no harm. In South Australia they are generally gathered by children. CONSUMPTION OF OLIVE OIL. During the year ending June 30, 1877, there were imported...
Page 15 - Sera in his miss1onary efforts 'to extend the spiritual conquest of the North.' Fifty years later it is recorded 'that all the seeds that Galvez had been so provident in sending up took root and prospered. The fathers built new missions, and continually replenished their stock of converts, which, at one time, were about twenty thousand. They planted vineyards, orchards, and the olive.' From San Diego the tree was transplanted to nearly all the other missions, and from these missions to various places...
Page 8 - Another fact worthy of notice which has been suspected, but for the proof of which the data has not before been attainable, is that the zone in the Sierra, known as the foot-hills, is as warm for the year, and as warm for the coldest month, as the Sacramento Valley in the same latitudes. This warm belt certainly extends to an elevation of 2,500 feet, Colfax, with an elevation of 2,421 feet, has a mean for the year of...

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