Wealth and Progress: A Critical Examination of the Wages Question

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D. Appleton, 1897 - Wages - 385 pages
 

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Page 192 - By necessaries I understand not only the commodities which are indispensably necessary for the support of life, but whatever the custom of the country renders it indecent for creditable people, even of the lowest order, to be without.
Page 125 - Here they should feed on fat beef and mutton, till nothing but their fulness should stint their stomachs; yea, they should feed on the labours of their own hands, enjoying a proportionable profit of their pains to themselves ; their beds should be good, and their bedfellows better, seeing the richest yeomen in England would not disdain to marry their daughters unto them...
Page 36 - The condition of the class can be bettered in no other way than by altering that proportion to their advantage : and every scheme for their benefit, which does not proceed on this as its foundation, is, for all permanent purposes, a delusion.
Page 36 - If wages are higher at one time or place than at another, if the subsistence and comfort of the class of hired labourers are more ample, it is for no other reason than because capital bears a greater proportion to population.
Page 175 - That the percentage of outlay for lodging or rent, and for fuel and light, is invariably the same, whatever the income.
Page 193 - ... can well fall into without extreme bad conduct. Custom, in the same manner, has rendered leather shoes a necessary of life in England. The poorest creditable person of either sex would be ashamed to appear in public without them.

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