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Books Books 1 - 10 of 12 on Banquet," 12mo., London, 1620, has the following epigram : — To Sir Ninian Ouzell.....
" Banquet," 12mo., London, 1620, has the following epigram : — To Sir Ninian Ouzell. (Ep. 94.) As Tarlton when his head was onely seene, The Tire-house doore and Tapistric betweene, Set all the multitude in such a laughter, They could not hold for scarse... "
Extracts from the Accounts of the Revels at Court, in the Reigns of Queen ... - Page xxvii
by Peter Cunningham - 1853 - 228 pages
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The biographical mirrour: comprising a series of ancient and ..., Volume 1

Francis Godolphin Waldron, Sylvester Harding, Edward Harding - Art - 1795
...assures us : ' Аз Tarlton when his head was onely seene, The Tire-house-doore, and Tapistrie bctwccne, Set all the multitude in such a laughter, They could not hold for scarse an honre after, So (Sir) I set you, (as I promis'd) forth, That all the world may wonder at your worth."...
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Cumberland's British Theatre: With Remarks, Biographical & Critical. Printed ...

George Daniel, Thomas Dolby - English drama - 1826
...that, — " Tarleton, when his head was onely " The Tire-house doore and tapistrie betweene, " Spt all the multitude in such a laughter, •' They could not hold for scarce an hour after." How truly every word of this applies to our modern Tarleton, a thousand merry...
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Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 5

Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith - 1839
..." Tarlton when his head was onely seene, The tire-house doore and tapistrie betweene, Set all tlie multitude in such a laughter, They could not hold for scarse an houre after." In those primitive times (when the play was ended) actors and auliences were wont to pass jokes —...
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Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 3

1839
...of a comedy. " Tarlton when big head was onely scene, The tire-house doore and tapistrie betwcene, Set all the multitude in such a laughter, They could not hold for scarse an houre after." $ In those primitive times (when the play was ended) actors and audiences were wont to pass jokes —...
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Publications, Volume 20

Shakespeare Society (Great Britain) - 1844
...Ouzell. (Ep. 94.) As Tarlton when his head was onely seene, The Tire-house doore and Tapistric betweene, Set all the multitude in such a laughter, They could...Our Tarlton was master of his faculty. When Queen Elizabeth was serious, I dare not say sullen, and out of good humour, he could un-dumpish her at his...
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Publications, Volume 18

1853
...without any other assistance. Nash says, " the people began exceedingly to laugh when Tarlton first pcept out his head." Peacham, in his " Thalia's Banquet,"...Our Tarlton was master of his faculty. When Queen Elizabeth was serious, I dare not say sullen, and out of good humour, he could un-dumpish her at his...
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Shakespeare Jest-books: Merie tales of Skelton. Jests of Scogin. Sackfull of ...

William Carew Hazlitt - Chapbooks - 1864
...Ninian Ou2ell. "As Tarlton, when his head was only seene The Tire-house doore and Tapistrie betweene, Set all the multitude in such a laughter They could not hold for scarce an houre after, So, Sir, I set you, as I promis'd, forth, That all the world may wonder at your...
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The Rose, the shamrock and the thistle, a magazine. Vol.1, June-vol.6, March

1864
...on the sta.' " So Tarleton, when his head was only seen The Tire-house door and Tapestrie between, Set all the multitude in such a laughter, They could not hold for scarce au hour after." Tarleton' s "jigs" were humorous metrical compositions, sung pmer-j by the clown...
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Shakespeariana, Volume 1

1883
...on the stage: " So Tarlton, when his head was only seen, The Tire house door and Tnpestrie between, Set all the multitude in such a laughter, They could not hold for scarce an hour after." Tarlton's "jigs" were humorous compositions, sung generally by the clown after...
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The Death of the Actor: Shakespeare on Page and Stage

Martin Buzacott - Drama - 1991 - 180 pages
...Tarlton was famous: Tarlton, when his head was only scene, The tire-house doore and tapestrie betweene, Set all the multitude in such a laughter, They could not hold for scarce an houre after.59 . . . the people began exceedingly to laugh when Tarlton first peeped out...
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