John Cassell's illustrated history of England. The text, to the reign of Edward i by J.F. Smith; and from that period by W. Howitt

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Page 397 - By a daisy whose leaves spread, Shut when Titan goes to bed; Or a shady bush or tree She could more infuse in me, Than all nature's beauties can In some other wiser man.
Page 264 - Honest men served you faithfully in this action. Sir, they are trusty : I beseech you, in the name of God, not to discourage them. I wish this action may beget thankfulness and humility in all that are concerned in it. He that ventures his life for the liberty of his country, I wish he trust God for the liberty of his conscience, and you for the liberty he fights for.
Page 213 - Put not your trust in princes, nor in the sons of men, for in them there is no salvation."*** He was soon able, however, to collect his courage; and he prepared himself to suffer the fatal sentence.
Page 320 - I forbade them to spare any that were in arms in the town, and, I think, that night they put to the sword about 2,000 men...
Page 431 - I, AB, do declare that it is not lawful upon any pretence whatsoever to take arms against the king, and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person or against those that are commissioned by him...
Page 270 - They have mouths, but they speak not: eyes have they, but they see not: They have ears, but they hear not: noses have they, but they smell not...
Page 154 - Westminster, while the court was sitting, and be whipped ; after whipping, be set upon the pillory a convenient time, and have one of his ears cut off, one side of his nose slit, and be branded in the face...
Page 212 - If he must die, it were charity to reprieve him till Saturday.
Page 34 - I think the Dane hath strangely wrought on our good English nobles; for those, whom I could never get to taste good liquor, now follow the fashion, and wallow in beastly delights. The ladies abandon their sobriety, and are seen to roll about in intoxication.
Page 311 - Mark, child, what I say. They will cut off my head, and perhaps make thee a King. But mark what I say, you must not be a King, so long as your brothers Charles and James do live; for they will cut off your brothers' heads (when they can catch them) and cut off thy head too at the last; and therefore I charge you, do not be made a king by them.

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