Horse-shoeing as it is and as it Should be

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
xiii
II
16
III
33
IV
44
V
54
VI
70
VII
75
VIII
81
IX
100
X
110
XI
141
XII
147

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 32 - A dog, which is at its full growth when between two and three years old, is very aged at twelve years. Horses do not, unless their growth is forced, reach their full prime until they are seven or eight years old. which by the same law leaves them to live some thirty years longer. When these facts are kept in mind, together with these other facts that three-fourths of our horses die or are destroyed under twelve years old, that horses are termed aged at six ' [he should have said eight], ' old at...
Page 118 - The best form for the external surface of the shoe is a regular concavity, that is the common shoe reversed. This shoe leaves the hoof of the same figure when shod as before its application. And it is evident that a concavity has more points of contact with pavement and other convex bodies than a flat or convex surface, and that the horse is consequently more secure on his legs. A shoe that is flat externally may preserve the hoof equally well in health ; but this form is not so well calculated to...
Page 79 - ... not come into contact with hard material, and that the horse can be best fitted for his work by having his feet smeared with tar, beeswax, or tallow, and by resting always on a heap of litter in the stable. It would be of little use to cite Lord Pembroke as declaring that " the constant use of litter makes the feet tender and causes swelled legs ; moreover, it renders the animals delicate. Swelled legs may be frequently reduced to their proper natural size by taking away the litter only, which,...
Page 10 - ... not a word to justify a suspicion that he would have shrunk from the hardest roadway of modern times. Xenophon is thus in complete agreement with Lord Pembroke's remark that the constant use of litter in a stable makes the feet tender and causes swelled legs. In his judgment the bare stone pavement will cool, harden, and improve a horse's feet merely by his standing on it. Acting on the same principle, Vegetius, as
Page 9 - Whoever at present, lets his farrier, groom, or coachman, in consideration of his having swept dung out of the stables for a greater or less number of years, ever even mention anything more than water-gruel, a clyster, or a little bleeding, and that too, very seldom ; or pretend to talk of the nature of the feet, of the seat of lameness, sicknesses, or their cures, may be certain to find himself very shortly quite on foot, and fondly arms an absurd and inveterate enemy against his own interest. It...
Page 32 - now admit that animals should live five times as long as it takes them to reach maturity. A dog, which is at its full growth when between two and three years old, is very aged at twelve years. Horses do not, unless their growth is forced, reach their full prime until they are seven or eight years old. which by the same law leaves them to live some thirty years longer. When these facts are kept in mind, together with these other facts that...
Page 12 - ... who will take the trouble to go to the wilds of Exmoor or Dartmoor. There, as in the Orkneys and on the Welsh hills and in many parts of the Continent of Europe, horses run unshod over rocks, through ravines, and up or down precipitous ridges. " Yet all this,
Page 58 - ... to the action of the fore leg, it will tend to explain some of the advantages to be derived from the curved shoe. When a horse is about to move, the first indication of motion is a bend at the knee, which necessarily raises the heels, and they become more and more elevated, till the toe (which is the last part that leaves the ground) is suspended for the moment that the foot is lifted. The base of the foot, just at its leaving the ground, is almost perpendicular: when the knee is bent to its...
Page 32 - If we take the age of three years as that at which horses begin to work, and twelve as that at which they are worn out, it follows that the period of their efficiency...
Page 148 - According to our ideas it should read " a bridle for the horse and a whip for the ass," but in the Eastern countries where he is treated well, the ass goes more freely than the horse.

Bibliographic information