A Treatise on the Culture and Management of Fruit Trees ...: To which is Added, a New and Improved Edition of "Observations on the Diseases, Defects and Injuries of All Kinds of Fruit and Forest Trees" ...

Front Cover
Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown and Green, 1824 - Fruit-culture - 523 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 444 - That an humble address be presented to his Majesty, that he will be graciously pleased to give directions that a monument be erected in the Cathedral Church of ST.
Page 453 - OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISEASES, DEFECTS, AND INJURIES, | IN ALL KINDS OF FRUIT AND FOREST TREES." WITH AN ACCOUNT OF | A PARTICULAR METHOD OF CURE, | PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF GOVERNMENT.
Page iii - Observations on the Diseases, Defects, and Injuries in all Kinds of Fruit and Forest Trees ; with an Account of a particular Method of Cure.
Page 453 - The composition being thus made, care must be taken to prepare the tree properly for its application, by cutting away all the dead, decayed, and injured part, till you come to the fresh sound wood, leaving the surface of the wood very smooth, and rounding off the edges of the bark with a draw-knife, or other instrument, perfectly smooth, which must be particularly attended to...
Page 454 - ... that happens, to rub it over with the finger when occasion may require (which is best done when moistened by rain), that the plaster may be kept whole, to prevent the air and Wet penetrating into the wound.
Page 453 - ... and a sixteenth part of a bushel of pit or river sand : the three last articles are to be sifted fine before they are mixed ; then work them well together with a spade, and afterwards with a wooden beater, until the stuff is very smooth, like fine plaster used for ceilings of rooms.
Page 303 - GRAFTING. Grafting is the taking a shoot from one tree and inserting it into another in such a manner that both may unite closely and become one tree. These shoots are called scions or grafts, and in the choice of them...
Page 457 - ... being blown down by the wind. It will, therefore, be necessary to leave part of the dead wood, at first, to strengthen the tree, and to cut it out by degrees as the new wood is formed. If there be any canker, or gum oozing, the infected parts must be pared off, or cut out with a proper instrument.
Page 454 - ... mixed with a sixth part of the same quantity of the ashes of burnt bones ; put it into a tin box with holes in the top, and shake the powder on the surface of the plaster, till the whole is covered over with it, letting it remain for half an hour to absorb the moisture ; then apply more powder, rubbing it on gently with the hand, and repeating the application of the powder till the whole plaster becomes a dry smooth surface.
Page 312 - ... a slope, and a slit made the contrary way, in the top of the slope, deep enough to receive the...

Bibliographic information