The History of Music: A Handbook and Guide for Students (Google eBook)

Front Cover
G. Schirmer, 1907 - Music - 683 pages
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Contents

II
17
III
23
IV
25
V
32
VI
50
VII
61
VIII
63
IX
93
XXVI
335
XXVII
355
XXVIII
371
XXIX
385
XXX
400
XXXI
409
XXXII
411
XXXIII
424

X
109
XI
111
XII
128
XIII
147
XIV
163
XV
165
XVI
180
XVII
194
XVIII
214
XIX
229
XX
247
XXI
249
XXII
273
XXIII
297
XXIV
315
XXV
333
XXXIV
438
XXXV
457
XXXVI
479
XXXVII
490
XXXVIII
499
XXXIX
501
XL
515
XLI
529
XLII
546
XLIII
562
XLIV
580
XLV
599
XLVI
617
XLVII
633
XLVIII
635
Copyright

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Page 81 - Sumer is icumen in, Lhude sing cuccu ! Groweth sed, and bloweth med, And springth the wude nu, Sing cuccu ! " Awe bleteth after lomb, Lhouth after calve cu ; Bulluc sterteth, bucke verteth, Murie sing cuccu ! "Cuccu, cuccu, well singes thu, cuccu, Ne swik thu naver nu ; Sing, cuccu, nu, sing, cuccu, Sing, cuccu, sing, cuccu, nu !
Page 7 - It is meant to be distinctly a book of reference for students rather than a literary or critical survey of a few salient aspects of the subject or a specialist's report of original research. Aiming at a certain degree of encyclopaedic fulness ... at every point an effort is made to emphasize the leading tendencies or movements of musical advance, referring to particular styles and composers as illustrations.
Page 690 - To avoid fine, this book should be returned on or before the date last stamped below. Stanford University Libraries Stanford, California Return this book on or before date due.
Page 77 - ... remained a somewhat peculiar specialty, representing the persistence for a particular purpose of a style which is essentially antique. Yet it must be confessed that in its ideal perfection, as it stood in the early Middle Ages, it was a remarkable example of melodic invention and beauty.1 ******** The positive achievements of the centuries following 1200 stand in striking contrast to the timid experiments of those before. From this point onward the art of music becomes interestingly interwoven...
Page 77 - ... the centuries following 1200 stand in striking contrast to the timid experiments of those before. From this point onward the art of music becomes interestingly interwoven with progress in other fields, being a phase of the general intellectual awakening of Europe that preceded the Renaissance. . . . The distinctive feature of the period in music was a profound alteration in the aim of composition. In Greek music and its successor, the Gregorian style, the one desire was for a single melodic outline...
Page 56 - Mese Lichanos meson Parhypate meson Hypate meson Lichanos hypaton Parhypate hypaton Hypate hypaton Proslambanomenos . IV.
Page 87 - Wherever this minstrelsy penetrated, it fixed a taste for styles quite diverse from that of the Church, one close to the feeling of the common people and apt for their use.
Page 295 - It is clear that he [Handel] occasionally adapted whole passages from other composers to his own uses, just as he transferred selections from one to another of his original works. But it was an age in which pasticcios or medleys abounded, strict creativeness being subordinated to concertistic success. We may doubt whether Handel's intent was deceptive, and surely there is no doubt about his capacity for origination. Many of the cases are merely those of borrowed subjects, which was and is an established...
Page 361 - ... brilliant illustration in music history of a genius that completely outgrew its original ambitions, so that it finally entered upon a creation of which at the start it did not dream. His historic significance lay, not so much in the new ideas . . . for these were not absent from some other minds ... but in his ability to bring them to tangible embodiment in works so beautiful and powerful as to arrest the attention of the musical world" (Waldo Selden Pratt in the History of Music).
Page 101 - Okeghem, we begin to feel the peculiar stimulus that the new century certainly gave to all music, so that in the works of these masters we catch the quality of enduring vitality and elevation by which the whole i6th century is characterized.

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