Caesarius of Arles: The Making of a Christian Community in Late Antique Gaul

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 12, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 344 pages
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This book studies the processes by which the pagan Roman Empire was transformed into the Christian Middle Ages. Drawing on the perspectives of social history, archaeology and anthropology, it focuses on the strategies of Bishop Caesarius of Arles (470SH542 AD) to promote Christian values, practices and beliefs among the pagans, Jews and Christians of southern France, and on the resistance provoked by his efforts among the population. This is the first book in English about Caesarius, and the only book to discuss southern Gaul during the sixth century.
 

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Contents

In search of the vita perfecta
16
Family and early life
18
Lerins
23
Late Roman Arles
33
Roman Arles
34
Community and religion in Roman Arles
44
The late Roman city
51
The beginnings of christianization
57
The councils of 52429
137
Christian rhetoric and ritual action
146
Sacred space and time
151
Miracles as communication
159
Christianity as a community religion
171
Defining the Christian community
172
The spectrum of Christian religiosity
181
Christian values and social behavior
188

Towards ecclesiastical primacy
65
Visigothic Arles
69
The making of a reformer
72
Pomerius and church reform
75
The burden of the episcopacy
82
Visigothic Ales and its bishop
88
Exile and the lex Romana Visigothorum
93
The Council of Agde
97
The monastery for women and the siege of Aries
104
The Ostrogothic peace
111
The aftermath of war and the ransoming of captives
113
The monastery for women
117
Ravenna
124
Rome
127
51323
132
The limits of christianization
201
Peasant society and culture
202
Peasant religion
209
Strategies of christianization and depaganization
226
The coming of the Franks
244
Protecting the womens monastery
250
The Frankish takeover
256
The death of Caesarius
260
Arles after Caesarius
261
Conclusions
271
The legacy of Caesarius
273
Select bibliography
287
Secondary works
291
Index
312
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Page 12 - Formerly while a presbyter, he had been accustomed, after composing his sermons, to commit them to memory, and then recite them in the church : but by diligent application he acquired confidence and made his instruction extemporaneous and eloquent. His discourses however were not such as to be received with much applause by his auditors, nor to deserve to be committed to writing.

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About the author (2004)

William E. Klingshirn is professor of Greek and Latin at the Catholic University of America. Linda Safran is associate professor of Fine Art at the University of Toronto.

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