An essay on the principles of translating the holy scriptures: with critical remarks on various passages, particularly in reference to the Tamul language

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Mission Press, 1827 - Bible - 58 pages
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Page 51 - And Lamech said unto his wives, ADAH and Zillah, hear my voice; Ye wives of Lamech, hearken unto my speech: For I have slain a man to my wounding, And a young man to my hurt.
Page 54 - This, it must be acknowledged, is the most essential of all. The second thing is, to convey into his version, as much as possible, in a consistency with the genius of the language which he writes, the author's spirit and manner, and, if I may so express myself, the very character of his style. The third, and last thing is, to take care that the version have at least so far the quality of an original performance, as to appear natural and easy...
Page 54 - It is incumbent on every translator to study the manner of his author ; to mark the peculiarities of his style, to imitate his features, his air, his gesture, and, as far as the difference of language will permit, even his voice ; in a word, to give a just and expressive resemblance of the original.
Page 16 - God ! 24 And the disciples were astonished at his words : but Jesus answereth again, and saith unto them, Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches to enter into the kingdom of God...
Page 32 - And when I bring a cloud over the earth, the bow shall be seen in the cloud...
Page 53 - And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith ; and shall not God avenge His own elect, who cry day and night unto Him, though He bear long with them ? I tell you that He will avenge them speedily.
Page 54 - To express fully and exactly the sense of the author is indeed the principal, but not the whole duty of the translator. In a work of elegance and genius he is not only to inform ; he must endeavour to please ; and to please by the same means, if possible, by which his author pleases.
Page 54 - The first and principal business of a translator is, to give the plain literal and grammatical sense of his author; the obvious meaning of his words, phrases, and sentences, and to express them in the language into which he translates, as far as may be, in equivalent words, phrases, and sentences.
Page 54 - The first thing, without doubt, which claims his attention, is to give a just representation of the sense of the original. This it must be acknowledged, is the most essential of all. The second thing is, to convey into his version, as much as possible, in a consistency with the genius of the language which he writes, the author's spirit and manner, and, if I may so express myself, the very character of his style. The third and last thing...
Page 5 - And to Sarah he said : Behold, I have given a thousand pieces of silver to thy brother.

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