The life and times of Louis xiv

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1838
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Page 325 - ... English ambassador, offered him, on the part of England and France, the independent sovereignty of Holland if he would abandon the other provinces to their grasp, and, urging his consent, asked him if he did not see that the republic was ruined. " There is one means," replied the Prince of Orange, " which will save me from the sight of my country's ruin — I will die in the last ditch.
Page 127 - ... Maupertuis to tell me that he suspected some one had told him to escape. But he overtook him in the square of the cathedral, and arrested him in my name towards mid-day. He demanded the papers that he had upon him, amongst which they tell me I shall find an account of the true state of Belle Isle ; but I have so many other things to do that I have not been able to see them yet. Nevertheless, I have commanded monsieur Boucherat to go and seal up every thing at the house of the superintendent,...
Page 217 - a grace more beautiful even than beauty's self," seemed written for her. She had a beautiful complexion, fair hair, a sweet smile; her eyes were blue, with an expression so tender, and yet at the same time so modest, that it gained both our hearts and our esteem at the same moment. Her charm was inexpressible; her voice so melodious that while reading the verses of Racine they seemed purposely composed to suit its tones. Further, she had but little wit, but that she did not fail...
Page 372 - Cond£, scarcely able to mount the steps at all (for he was suffering severely from the gout), besought the Monarch to pardon him for making him wait. " Cousin," replied the King with a smile, " when one is so loaded with laurels, it is, of course, difficult to walk.
Page 217 - ... eyes were blue, with an expression so tender, and yet at the same time so modest, that it gained both our hearts and our esteem at the same moment. Her charm was inexpressible; her voice so melodious that while reading the verses of Racine they seemed purposely composed to suit its tones. Further, she had but little wit, but that she did not fail to cultivate continually by reading.
Page 76 - ... important to both parties than was thus rendered by Mazarin to Louis and Colbert; and in favour of the latter he spoke long and eloquently to the young monarch, ending an eulogium, such as Mazarin seldom pronounced upon any one, by the remarkable words, "Sire, I owe your majesty every thing; but I i 2 believe I can repay you in a great degree by giving you monsieur Colbert.
Page 12 - France; but he began to pay court also to those who were about the person of the king's younger brother, and even to several of that prince's attendants whom he had maltreated on former occasions. The young King was carried to Calais, in his carriage, as to a more healthy spot ; but the disease only became worse every hour ; the physicians declared that the case was beyond hope ; and Bussy assures us that a number of the courtiers even went and congratulated the young Duke of Anjou on his accession...
Page 399 - ... enterprizing, but seeing that rashness was in fashion, he no longer took the precautions he had done, and as he concerted his measures better than others, he won every battle he fought. His prudence was the result of temperament — his boldness, of experience. He had great enlargement of mind, and was capable of governing a state, as well as an army. He was not ignorant of belles-lettres ; he knew something of the Latin poets, and a thousand beautiful passages from the French poets : he was...
Page 12 - ... his carriage, as to a more healthy spot ; but the disease only became worse every hour ; the physicians declared that the case was beyond hope ; and Bussy assures us that a number of the courtiers even went and congratulated the young Duke of Anjou on his accession to the throne. Louis himself does not seem to have lost his senses or his presence of mind ; he spoke with calmness of his approaching fate, and, sending for Mazarin, he said to him, " You have always been one of my best friends :...
Page 70 - Car après ces mulets marchaient quinze attelages, Puis sa Maison, et puis ses pages, Se panadant en bel arroi, Montés sur chevaux aussi sages Que pas un d'eux, comme je croi. Figurez-vous que dans la France II n'en est point de plus haut prix, Que l'un bondit, que l'autre danse; Et que cela n'est rien au prix Des mulets de Son Éminence.

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