Preliminary Report of Explorations in Nebraska and Dakota in the Years 1855-'56-'57

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1875 - Dakota - 125 pages
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Page 28 - Mountains, 8,500 feet above the level of the plains, and an elevation of 14,500 above that of the sea, in the region where the snow lies all the year. To a person standing in one of these swarms as they pass over and around him, the air becomes sensibly darkened, and the sound produced by their wings resembles that of the passage of a train of cars on a railroad when standing two or three hundred yards from the track. The Mormon settlements have suffered more from the ravages of these insects than...
Page 23 - ... valley which rivers generally have, and which enable us to look down at the stream often many miles distant. Through the greater portion of the middle half of its course you have scarcely any indication of it as you approach, till within close proximity, and then you look down from the steep bluffs, and catch, at the distance of two hundred to five hundred yards, only here and there a glimpse of the river below, so much is it hidden by the precipitous bluffs which at the bends stand at the wateredge....
Page 23 - Missouri to the mountains makes nowhere an angle greater than one-half degree with the horizon. A remarkable feature in regard to this change of slope which occurs in the neighborhood of the course of the Niobrara is the shortness of its tributaries, the surface drainage seeming to be away from and not toward its banks.
Page 20 - Sihasapas and our position, which was sufficiently unpleasant in the presence of such a numerous party of half-avowed enemies, was rendered doubly so by a storm of sleet and snow, which lasted two days and nights, and against which we had but little protection. " A young Indian who had accompanied us from Fort Laramie, considered the danger to us so imminent that he forsook our camp and joined his friends, the Minikanyes. Under these embarrassing circumstances my associates evinced the most resolute...
Page 39 - These forks are supplied by numerous streams from the mountains, and they unite in about longitude 102° 20', the river flowing into the Missouri in latitude 44° 48'. In its lower course I am informed there is fertile land on its banks, and there are considerable areas in and around the Black Hills. The Shyenne River can probably be rafted, and the streams that come from the hills could be used to drive the logs down the river.
Page 53 - There are so many inevitable causes at work to produce a war with the Dakotas before many years, that I regard the greatest fruit of the explorations I have conducted to be the knowledge of the proper routes by which to invade their country and conquer them.
Page 12 - ... who will report to you for duty. Transportation for the provision and equipage of the escort, their subsistence, and their necessary ammunition, will be furnished, respectively, by the Quartermaster's, Commissary, and Ordnance Departments. Upon the proper requisitions, officers of the Quartermaster's and Commissary Departments at the military posts near the routes pursued by the expedition...
Page 3 - Very respectfully, your obedient servant, AA HUMPHREYS, Brigadier General and Chief of Engineers.
Page 42 - Niobrara is a very shallow and " swift-flowing stream," as the Canadians say " 1'Eau qui Court," abounding in rapids in two-thirds of its upper course, and in its middle portion filled with small islands. In the lower portion its width exceeds that of the Missouri River, and is spread out over sand-bars. The bed in the broad portions is quicksand and difficult to ford. Its waters rapidly increase in volume through its middle portion, from the multitude...
Page 28 - ... the air becomes sensibly darkened, and the sound produced by their wings resembles that of the passage of a train of cars on a railroad when standing two or three hundred yards from the track. The Mormon settlements have suffered more from the ravages of these insects than probably all other causes combined. They destroyed nearly all the vegetables cultivated last year at Fort Randall, and extended their ravages east as far as Iowa.

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