Stories by American Authors ...: Stockton, F. R. The transferred ghost. Jacobi, Mary P. A martyr to science. [Stimson, F. J.] Mrs. Knollys, by J. S. of Dale. Eddy, J. A dinner-party. Spofford, Harriet P. The Mount of sorrow. Tincker, Mary A. Sister Silvia

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C. Scribner's sons, 1900 - Short stories, American
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Page 144 - He putteth forth his hand upon the rock ; he overturneth the mountains by the roots. He cutteth out rivers among the rocks ; and his eye seeth every precious thing.
Page 91 - ... a boy of one and twenty lying asleep, a ghost from another world coming to confront her from the distant past, immortal in the immortality of the glacier. There was his quaint coat, of the fashion of half a century before ; his blue eyes open ; his young, clear brow ; all the form of the past she had forgotten ; and she his bride stood there to welcome him, with her wrinkles, her bent figure, and thin white hairs. She was living, he was dead ; and she was two and forty years older than he. Then...
Page 89 - She went home, and was silent with her friends about what had happened. In the moonlight she went back, and again the next morning before dawn. She told no one of her going; but the old guide met her at the door, and walked silently behind her. She had slept, the glacier ever present in her dreams. The sun had not yet risen when she came; and she sat a long time in the cavern, listening to the murmur of the river, flowing under the glacier at her feet. Slowly the dawn began, and again she seemed...
Page 90 - God ! not her Charles; not the Charles of her own thought, who had lived through life with her and shared her sixty years ; not the old man she had borne thither in her mind — but a boy, a boy of one and twenty lying asleep, a ghost from another world coming to confront her from the distant past, immortal in the immortality of the glacier. There was his quaint coat, of the fashion of half a century before ; his blue eyes open ; his young, clear brow ; all the form of the past she had forgotten...
Page 139 - Have you any more reliable knowledge concerning the mat being yours ? A, Yes, for the space in the middle was made expressly to fit the base of the statuette. Q. And are you willing to risk your testimony upon that fact alone ? A. I am. The mat and the statuette were then shown the witness and the jury, and the base of the statuette overlapped the plain surface in the centre of the mat half an inch. The witness became faint, and was carried into the lobby. The jury, without leaving their seats, rendered...
Page 74 - Charles secretly thought Box Hill an eminence far preferable to the Venediger, and Charles's face an infinitely more interesting sight than any lake, however expressive. But the sun, looking askance at them through the lower mist, was not jealous ; all the same he spread his glory lavishly for them, and the bright little mirror of a lake twinkled cannily upward from below. Finally it grew dark ; then there was less talking. It was full night when they went in, she leaning on his arm and looking up;...
Page 86 - Charles Knollys — lost in Carinthia " This was all she would have inscribed ; he was but lost ; no one knew that he was dead. Was he not yet to be found? There was no grassy mound beside it; the earth was smooth. Not even the date was there. But Mrs. Knollys never went to read it. She waited until he should come ; until that last journey, repeating the travels of their wedding-days, when she should go to Germany to bring him home. So the woman's life went on in England, and the glacier in the Alps...
Page 83 - And it told her, with tender sympathy oddly blended with the pride of scientific success, that he had given a year's most careful study to the place; with all his instruments of measurement he had tested the relentless glacier's flow ; and it closed by assuring her that her husband might yet be found — in five and forty years. In five and forty years — the poor professor staked his scientific reputation on the fact — in five and forty years she might return, and the glacier would give up its...
Page 88 - English girl who had been there in the young days of the century; not even the innkeeper, had he been there. But he, too, was long since dead. Mrs. Knollys was now bent and white-haired ; she had forgotten, herself, how she had looked in those old days.
Page 126 - On the afternoon previous to the sitting of the court at which Malcolm was under bail to appear, he unexpectedly presented himself at Mr. Burchard's office. The conflicting emotions in Mr. Burchard's breast upon beholding him can well be imagined. Indignation for the imposition and forgery was most apparent. Vengeance was secondary, tempered by the fact that he had made his appearance, although not yet safe in jail. His soul burst forth in a holy horror of a man apparently incapable of entertaining...

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