Waverley Novels, Volume 1

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Adam & Charles Black, 1886
 

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Page 118 - Gordon, and that at deep midnight, through scenes of difficulty and toil, separated from his attendant, left by his guide :—What a variety of incidents for the exercise of a romantic imagination, and all enhanced by the solemn feeling of uncertainty, at least, if not of danger ! The only circumstance which assorted ill with the rest, was the cause of his journey— the Baron's milk cows ! this degrading incident he kept in the background. While wrapt in these dreams of imagination, his companion...
Page 480 - WAKEN, lords and ladies gay, On the mountain dawns the day, All the jolly chase is here, With hawk, and horse, and hunting-spear ! Hounds are in their couples yelling, Hawks are whistling, horns are knelling, Merrily, merrily, mingle they,
Page 6 - I had a distinguished character for that talent, at a time when the applause of my companions was my recompense for the disgraces and punishments which the future romance-writer incurred for being idle himself, and keeping others idle, during hours that should have been employed on our tasks.
Page 91 - Edward, on the contrary, loved to fill up and round the sketch with the colouring of a warm and vivid imagination, which gives light and life to the actors and speakers in the drama of past ages.
Page 352 - And every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, gathered themselves unto him; and he became a captain over them: and there were with him about four hundred men.
Page 495 - I shall be well enough presently, if you will only let me sit where you are, and take my chair; for there is a confounded hand in sight of me here, which has often bothered me before, and now it won't let me fill my glass with a good will.
Page 480 - Diamonds on the brake are gleaming : And foresters have busy been, To track the buck in thicket green ; Now we come to chant our lay, "Waken, lords and ladies gay.
Page 191 - My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here, My heart's in the Highlands, a-chasing the deer; A-chasing the wild deer, and following the roe, My heart's in the Highlands wherever I go...
Page 34 - I am aware I may be here reminded of the necessity of rendering instruction agreeable to youth, and of Tasso's infusion of honey into the medicine prepared for a child ; but an age in which children are taught the driest doctrines by the insinuating method of instructive games, has little reason to dread the consequences of study being rendered too serious or severe. The history of England is now reduced to a game at cards...
Page 481 - You shall see him brought to bay, " Waken, lords and ladies gay." Louder, louder chant the lay, Waken, lords and ladies gay ; Tell them, youth, and mirth, and glee, Run a course as well as we, Time, stern huntsman ! who can baulk, Stanch as hound, and fleet as hawk? Think of this, and rise with day, Gentle lords and ladies gay.

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