The Story of the Rotor

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F.O. Willhofft, 1926 - Rotor ships - 110 pages
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Page 54 - ... I cooperated in organizing the Institute voor Aero-en-Hydro-Dynamik, Amsterdam, Holland (Institute for Hydro and Aero Dynamics) of which I took over the management." It was to study the practical engineering and economic problems of flow laws especially, and to forward their industrial utilization. "The wind propulsion of ships attracted our interest more than anything else. There was no doubt in our minds that the visibly progressing decay of the sailing ship, which could not appreciably be...
Page 19 - Incredulously and pityingly they [shippers and shipbuilders] often looked upon me", writes Flettner, "and they often shrugged their shoulders when I mentioned that in a storm or hurricane this free rudder thrown about by the huge waves would swing back and forth without the steadiness of the ship's course being affected in the slightest degree * * * they even looked upon me as an impractical dreamer...
Page 84 - ... rotorship and its details had spread all over the world. From all continents my company and I received telegrams with congratulations and offers of financing. For months my business and private mail reached a volume which could hardly be handled Many hundreds of offers of inventions and patent applications are still being sent to us. It was interesting to observe how in almost all classes of the population, not only among scientists and engineers, but in all kinds of other callings, people occupied...
Page 58 - ... generating a circular flow about a fixed section rigidly mounted on the ship. By selecting at will the direction of the circulation the desired pressure was to be exerted on the ship. [This would utilize a well known flow law that any acceleration in a fluid produces suction, any retardation, pressure.] On September 16, 1922, I applied for a German patent on this idea. While working along these lines I conceived the idea of using fixed planes about which a skin would revolve. Originally I thought...
Page 84 - ... ready for her trials in the Baltic. She exceeded expectations, being faster than before, sailing much closer to the wind, hardly noticing severe hail squalls, and her rotors have never required alteration nor repair. The result was an immense sensation. "In a few days the news of the rotorship and its details had spread all over the world. From all continents my company and I received telegrams with congratulations and offers of financing. For months my business and private mail reached a volume...
Page 58 - Combination It was reserved to Anton Flettner to make this association of Magnus effect and sails, in a well remembered hour of which he tells. Puzzling over the fundamental reformation of sails thru flow laws, he had occupied himself with "the problem of artificially generating a circular flow about a fixed section rigidly mounted on the ship. By selecting at will the direction of the circulation the desired pressure was to be exerted on the ship. [This would utilize a well known flow law that any...
Page 94 - Apparently there have been windmills in China and Japan thousands of years ago. Even Hammurabi reports about windmotors which were intended to furnish power for the great irrigation systems of Babylon. In Egypt old mills still exist which are supposed to have been erected two thousand years ago. The Arabian explorer Istachri (134 AC) reports about the use of windmills in the Persian province of Segistan.
Page 85 - Goettingen experiments and the numerous lectures on the Magnus effect would soon have been left on the ash heap of dry-as-dust scientific experiments, and that only now and then a theorist would have used them for his scientific work.
Page 83 - Bucfau was ready for her trials in the Baltic. She exceeded expectations, being faster than before, sailing much closer to the wind, hardly noticing severe hail squalls, and her rotors have never required alteration nor repair. The result was an immense sensation. "In a few days...
Page 92 - Previous to April 1926, when it established a separate class for aircraft, the German Patent Office had the same classification for airplanes as for children's toys, popular amusements, and shooting galleries.66 It has not been merely fear of flying that has delayed the popular use of flying as a means of transportation. The establishment of airdromes at great distances from the centers of large cities because of the high prices demanded for the land by property holders has contributed...

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