History of the British Possessions in the East Indies, Volume 1

Front Cover
Whittaker & Company, 1837 - East Indies
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 94 - The number of temples is very great, mostly small and stuck like shrines in the angles of the streets, and under the shadow of the lofty houses. Their forms, however, are not ungraceful, and...
Page 95 - Fakirs' houses, as they are called, occur at every turn, adorned with idols, and sending out an unceasing tinkling and strumming of vinas, biyals, and other discordant instruments ; while religious mendicants of every Hindoo sect, offering every conceivable deformity, which chalk, cow-dung, disease, matted locks, distorted limbs and disgusting and hideous attitudes of penance can show, literally line the principal streets on both sides.
Page 94 - The material of the building is a very good stone from Chunar, but the Hindoos here seem fond of painting them a deep red colour, and indeed of covering the more conspicuous parts of their houses with paintings in gaudy colours of flower-pots, men, women, bulls, elephants, gods and goddesses, in all their many-formed, many-headed, manyhanded, and many-weaponed varieties.
Page 338 - ... polluted nature of particular viands. Thus many Brahmins eat both fish and kid. The Rajpoots, besides these, eat mutton, venison, or goat's flesh. Some castes may eat any thing but fowls, beef, or pork ; while pork is with others a favourite diet, and beef only is prohibited.
Page 339 - The name of this sect is Paramahansa ; and I have received authentic information of individuals of this sect being not very unusually seen about Benares, floating down the river on, and feeding on a corpse. Nor is this a low despicable tribe ; but on the contrary, esteemed by themselves at least as a very high one ; and my information stated that the human brain is judged by these epi1 Narrative of a Journey, &c. vol. iii. p. 251, 277, 3-17. curean cannibals as the most delicious morsel of their...
Page 295 - Tbe bold assailant in this frightful contest soon re-appeared on the opposite side of the shark, swimming fearlessly with the hand he had at liberty, and holding the rope behind his back with the other. The shark, which had also by this time made his appearance again, immediately swam towards him ; and while the animal was apparently in the act of lifting himself over the lower part of the native's body, that he might seize upon his prey, the man making a strong effort, threw...
Page 239 - Anjengo in the rainy season to pass a few weeks with the chief at his country house at Eddova, in a rural and sheltered situation; on my departure I locked up a room, containing books, drawings, and a few valuables ; as I took the key with me the servant could not enter to clean the furniture: the walls of the room were white-washed, adorned with prints and drawings, in English frames and glasses: returning home in the evening, and taking a cursory view of my cottage by candle-light...
Page 238 - The termites, or white ants of Bombay, are so numerous and destructive at Anjengo, that it is difficult to guard against their depredations ; in a few hours they will demolish a large chest of books, papers, silk, or clothes, perforating them with a thousand holes...
Page 319 - In Malabar, the huts, called chera, are like bee-hives, and consist of a circular mud wall about three feet high, which is covered with a long conical roof of thatch. Contrary to what might have been expected in a hot climate, but agreeable to the custom of almost all Hindoos, one small door is the only outlet for smoke, and the only inlet for air and light.
Page 280 - Think'st thou there is no tyranny but that Of blood and chains ? The despotism of vice — The weakness and the wickedness of luxury — The negligence — the apathy — the evils Of sensual sloth — produce ten thousand tyrants, Whose delegated cruelty surpasses The worst acts of one energetic master, However harsh and hard in his own bearing.

Bibliographic information