Cooperative Breeding in Birds: Long Term Studies of Ecology and Behaviour

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 19, 1990 - Nature - 615 pages
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Stacey and Koenig discuss the phenomenon of cooperative breeding among birds, an unusual kind of social behavior common to only a few hundred species worldwide, in which individuals other than the male-female pairs help to raise the young of a single nest or den. Because certain individuals aid in raising offspring which are not their own, cooperative breeding gives rise to some of the clearest examples of altruism among animals. This unique breeding behavior is of interest to evolutionary biologists and behavioral ecologists since such species exhibit some of the most unusual and bizarre social behavior observed anywhere in the animal kingdom. The studies are all long term and consequently the book summarizes some of the most extensive studies of the behavior of marked individuals ever undertaken. Graduate students and research workers in ornithology, sociobiology, behavioral ecology and evolutionary biology will find much of value in this book.

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About the author (1990)

Walter D. Koenig is Senior Scientist at the Lab of Ornithology and the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell University. He has studied cooperative breeding in acorn woodpeckers for over forty years. He is co-editor of Cooperative Breeding in Birds: Long-Term Studies of Ecology and Behavior (Cambridge, 1990) and Ecology and Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in Birds (Cambridge, 2004), and has published widely, primarily in the fields of population and behavioral ecology.

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