Wife to Mr Milton

Front Cover
Penguin Books, Limited, Jan 24, 2012 - Great Britain - 330 pages
2 Reviews

Marie Powell is sixteen when her father marries her to the poet John Milton in payment of a debt. They move to a pretty garden-house in London, but she struggles to adjust to her new life. Her husband is high-minded and unyielding, and only makes Marie long for the man she really loves. As Civil War sweeps across England and the King is killed, a battle starts to rage between husband and wife - one that only the powerful can win.

Told through the fictional journals of Milton's wife, Robert Graves's sympathetic and sensitive reconstruction of her tragic life is also a convincing, linguistically rich portrait of seventeenth-century England as it is ravaged by war.

'Vivid, rich and forthright.' Sunday Times

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WIFE TO MR. MILTON: The Story Of Marie Powell

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

There's a strange fascination in this unusual story of the sixteen year old girl who became the wife of the famous poet —it's a holding story despite its deliberately archaic style, for it is told as ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ladybug74 - LibraryThing

The language used in this book was a bit dated and stuffy, so it was a slow read at times. There was a lot of information that was interesting from a historical standpoint, despite the dated language that was used. Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Robert Graveswas born in 1895 in Wimbledon, the son of Irish writer Perceval Graves and Amalia Von Ranke. He went from school to the First World War, where he became a captain in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. After this, apart from a year as Professor of English Literature at Cairo University in 1926, he earned his living by writing, mostly historical novels, including- I, Claudius; Claudius the God; Count Belisarius; Wife of Mr Milton; Sergeant Lamb of the Ninth; Proceed, Sergeant Lamb; The Golden Fleece; They Hanged My Saintly Billy; and The Isles of Unwisdom. He wrote his autobiography, Goodbye to All That, in 1929, and it was soon established as a modern classic. The Times Literary Supplementacclaimed it as 'one of the most candid self portraits of a poet, warts and all, ever painted', as well as being of exceptional value as a war document. Two of his most discussed non-fiction works are The White Goddess, which presents a new view of the poetic impulse, and The Nazarine Gospel Restored(with Joshua Podro), a re-examination of primitive Christianity. He also translated Apuleius, Lucan and Suetonius for the Penguin Classics, and compiled the first modern dictionary of Greek Mythology, The Greek Myths. His translation of The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

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