Paying the Price of Catastrophic Illness: From Accidents to Alzheimer's : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, January 28, 1987, Volume 4

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Page 42 - Reports, with approximately 3.5 million paid circulation, regularly carries articles on health, product safety, marketplace economics, and legislative, judicial, and regulatory actions which affect consumer welfare.
Page 42 - November 1986, we sponsored a conference on "Ending Poverty — Issues for the Middle Class." One theme which emerged from the conference was that inadequate access to health care at a reasonable cost is a major barrier to escaping poverty. Many working families live on the edge of poverty or y actually fall into it because they experience high, unreimbursed health care costs.
Page 43 - Committees on Aging, by the Federal Trade Commission, and by several state insurance departments. In addition to marketing abuses such as "loading up" (selling multiple overlapping policies to vulnerable consumers), "twisting...
Page 52 - Report's analysis should have considered two additional options: (a) a voluntary Medicare Part C to cover long-term care needs, financed in part by a premium paid by participants and in part by cost-sharing and (b) expanding Medicare to cover long-term care coverage for all participants.
Page 42 - Ending Poverty — Issues for the Middle Class." One theme which emerged from the conference was that inadequate access to health care at a reasonable cost is a major barrier to escaping poverty. Many working families live on the edge of poverty or actually fall into it because they experience high, unreimbursed health care costs. As many as 37 million people in our nation face limited access to health care because they do not have health insurance. Consumers Union is committed to doing what it can...
Page 69 - Foundation commends you for your willingness to take upon yourselves the charge to look at this incredibly conplex issue. There will have to be a concerted effort on your part to pierce the rhetoric and the reality of the insurance and reinsurance industry. Perhaps your report can serve as a major contribution to the education of insurance companies and employers public, private and not-for-profit - so that they can begin to understand exactly what is and what is not covered in the medical policies...
Page 45 - Report indicate that 10% of the elderly have out-of-pocket health care liabilities of $1000 or more a year. [Bowen Report, p. 26] Additionally, this financial burden does not fall according to ability to pay. Expected out-of-pocket expenditures represent a much larger percent of income for low-income consumers than of higher income consumers. [Changing the Structure of Medicare Benefits; Issues and Options...
Page 67 - Committee on Trauma Research, Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine: Injury in America: A Continuing Public Health Problem.
Page 41 - We recognize that a catastrophic insurance program of the type proposed by Secretary Bowen would displace a portion of medigap policies and would force many medigap policies to restructure their benefits. We welcome this shift to the public sector, because we believe that an expanded Medicare can serve consumers far better than the private medigap market. Medicare's administrative costs are 3% [The Medicare and Medicaid Data Book. Health Care Financing Administration, 1983, pp.
Page 48 - Market The consistent failure of the medigap market to meet the needs of health care consumers clearly justifies an expanded role for the federal government in establishing catastrophic illness and long-term care protection. In the late 1970 's, abuses in the medicare supplement insurance market were exposed by the House and Senate Select Committees on Aging, by the Federal Trade Commission, and by several state insurance departments. In addition to marketing abuses such as "loading up...

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