Judicial Crimes: A Record of Some Famous Trials in English History in which Bigotry, Popular Panic, and Political Rancour Played a Leading Part

Front Cover
Hutchinson & Company, 1902 - Law - 263 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 136 - trial, but when he heard his doom he went into agonies of despair, gave himself up for dead, and chose a text for his funeral sermon. His forebodings were just. He was not, indeed, scourged quite so severely as Gates had been, but he had not Oates's iron strength of body and mind. After the execution
Page 53 - a religion which demanded from its followers services directly opposed to the first principles of morality. He declared that, in his judgment, Pagans who had never heard the name of Christ, and who were guided only by the light of nature, were more trustworthy members of civil society than men who had been
Page 127 - to be pilloried in Palace Yard, to be led round Westminster Hall with an inscription declaring his infamy over his head, to be pilloried again in front of the Royal Exchange, to be whipped from Aldgate to Newgate, and, after
Page 53 - told the House of Commons from the pulpit that it was their duty to make effectual provisions against the propagation of a religion more mischievous than irreligion itself, a religion which demanded from its followers services directly opposed to the first principles of morality.
Page 132 - was that the Court of King's Bench was not competent to degrade a priest from his sacred office or to pass a sentence of perpetual imprisonment, and that therefore the judgment against Gates was contrary to law, and ought to be reversed. The Lords
Page 54 - this marriage, there was reason to fear that they might be bred Roman Catholics, and that a long succession of princes hostile to the established faith might sit on the English throne. The constitution had recently been violated
Page 124 - had been all horror and despair; and with his last breath he had told his attendants to throw him into a ditch like a dog, for that he was not fit to sleep in a Christian burial-ground.
Page 53 - He declared that, in his judgment, Pagans who had never heard the name of Christ, and who were guided only by the light of nature, were more trustworthy members of civil society than men who had been
Page 119 - His Majesty was in a very good humour, and took up some time in displaying to us the fallacy and emptiness of those who pretend to a fuller measure of sanctity than their neighbours, and pronounced them to be, for the most part, abominable hypocrites and the most arrant knaves.
Page 79 - was a damnable and hellish plot, contrived and carried on by the Popish recusants, for assassinating the King, subverting the Government, and rooting out the Protestant religion.

Bibliographic information