Species intelligibilis. 1. Classical roots and medieval discussions

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BRILL, 1994 - Philosophy - 452 pages
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This study examines the history of a fundamental problem in Aristotelian cognitive psychology, i.e. the nature and function of the mechanisms that provide the human mind with data concerning physical reality. Chapter I traces the Classical and Arabic prehistory of the Medieval doctrine of intelligible species. Scholastic discussions on formal mediation in intellective cognition were constrained in essential ways by Thomas. Chapter II analyzes his views on mental representation in the context of the reception of Peripatetic psychology in the West. The following chapters (III-V) examine the controversies about the necessity of intelligible species, from Aquinas' death to the 15th century. Another volume is planned, devoted to Renaissance discussions, developments of later Scholasticism, and the elimination of the intelligible species in modern non-Aristotelian philosophy.
 

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Contents

Critical evaluation
9
ORIGINS OF THE SPECIES INTELLIGIBILIS IN ANCIENT
28
FROM THE SPREAD OF ARABIC AND ARISTOTELIAN
109
GENESIS OF
175
First positive reactions to Thomas doctrine
186
FOURTEENTHCENTURY DEVELOPMENTS
256
Ferrandus Hyspanus and Thomas Wilton
321
Taddheus of Panna
336
LATE MEDIEVAL DISCUSSIONS
352
Heymeric de Campo
365
Peter Crockaert
379
Apollinare Offredi
392
The ontology of the intelligible species
407
INDEX PERSONARUM
442
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About the author (1994)

Leen Spruit received his Ph.D. in philosophy (1987) from the University of Amsterdam. He was research fellow at the Universities of Amsterdam and Utrecht. His main interests are in the history of Medieval and early modern epistemology. Publications include: "Il problema della conoscenza in Giordano Bruno" (Naples 1988), which was awarded the "Prins Bernhard Fonds" prize in 1988. He currently lives in Rome.

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