Rambles in Egypt and Candia: With Details of the Military Power and Resources of Those Countries, and Observations on the Government, Policy, and Commercial System of Mohammed Ali, Volume 1

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H. Colburn, 1837 - Crete
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Page 32 - ... clothing, the bunting, serges, &c., are of Egyptian manufacture. Very few things are English, and of these bar-iron was the only article that figured conspicuously. In the storehouses I noticed some brass swivel guns, of about a pound calibre : a few were English, but the greater part were of native workmanship. They were all fitted with percussion locks. The number of men employed in the Arsenal amounts to three thousand. I was rather startled on receiving this information ; but, on counting...
Page 231 - He also built a pyramid, but it was not so large as his brother's, for I measured them both. It has no subterraneous chambers, nor any channel for the admission of the Nile, which, in the other pyramid, is made to surround an island where the body of Cheops is said to be deposited.
Page 179 - He wore no jewels of any kind upon his person — not even a ring ; but the pipe which he held in his hand, and occasionally applied to his lips, was blazing with diamonds and other precious stones. He is decidedly a handsome old man ; but his fine grey beard is hardly in keeping with his vivacity and personal activity. In the expression of his quick and piercing eye, there is more of jocoseness than cunning; and if his high and ample forehead does not give the lie to the assertions of his detractors,...
Page 179 - ... if his high and ample forehead does not give the lie to the assertions of his detractors, it forms the exception to the rules of Spurzheim ; for never did I see the organ of benevolence more strongly developed. A peculiarity in his mode of wearing the turban, close down over his eyes, takes off much from the fine character of his countenance, concealing his handsome forehead, compressing the eyebrows, throwing the eyes into shade, and giving them a sinister expression which is foreign to them...
Page 61 - The fruits, though fine to the sight, do not attain the flavour of the same species in other climates. The citrons, lemons, and oranges, for instance, are by no means so good as those of Spain. The limes and bananas are inferior to those of the West Indies ; and even the dates, the staple of the country, are not to be compared with those of Western Africa. The nights probably are too cold, and the vegetation, forced on by abundant irrigation, may possibly be too rapid. The vegetables, though large,...
Page 181 - ... as to form a kind of avenue leading up to the presence. A seventh, of a more portable size, was placed near the others, as I first thought, to make up the mystic number, seven ; but I afterwards found that it was kept at hand to enable the Viceroy to read any papers that might be presented to him. Our visit lasted, altogether, about an hour. During the whole of that time, the apartment was open to all such persons as had the usual right of entree, as well as to those whose names had been given...
Page 33 - ... workmen, with very few exceptions, are natives of the country, and their work, considering the age at which they commenced learning their respective trades, and the short time they have been employed at them, is surprisingly good. The foremen are mostly foreigners — Frenchmen, Italians, and Maltese. The director of the establishment and naval architect (Cerisy Bey) is a native of France. " The pay of a foreman is about two shillings and three pence per diem ; that of a workman varies according...
Page 109 - It was also equally evident from the looks of the natives, as well as every other appearance, that our former friendship was at an end, and that we had nothing to do but to" hasten our departure to some different island, where our vices were not known, and where our extrinsic virtues might gain us another short space of being wondered at, and doing as we pleased, or, as our tars expressed it, of being happy by the month.
Page 33 - ... pence. Such as are on the lowest rate of pay receive, however, an allowance of food, in addition. These are scanty pittances, when compared with the wages of artificers in other countries, but by no means so in a land where meat is but seldom eaten, and in which all the articles considered by the natives as the necessaries of life are to be obtained for a mere trifle.
Page 223 - ... much excited, that her friends would not suffer her to remain longer under the magic influence. The conjuror refused to try his art upon grown-up males. The delusion is evidently produced by gradually working upon feelings already predisposed, by superstition, or other causes, to the necessary state of excitement. The extraordinary power of association, as in the diseased system of a dreamer, makes the victim believe that he sees anything brought to his imagination. The fumes of the incense,...

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