The Way Out: Has Man a Right to Sell His Labor in the Open Market for Any Price He Pleases? No. If He Does So, Does it Concern Anybody Besides Himself? Yes

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J.H. Barry Company, 1904 - Labor - 169 pages
 

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Page 96 - All men are by nature free and independent, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; and pursuing and obtaining safety- and happiness.
Page 85 - All men are, by nature, free and independent, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and seeking and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 52 - Military necessity does not admit of cruelty, that is, the infliction of suffering for the sake of suffering or for revenge, nor of maiming or wounding except in fight, nor of torture to extort confessions. It does not admit of the use of poison in any way, nor of the wanton devastation of a district. It admits of deception, but disclaims acts of perfidy; and, in general, military necessity does not include any act of hostility which makes the return to peace unnecessarily difficult.
Page 46 - The rights and interests of the laboring man will be protected and cared for — not by the labor agitators, but by the Christian men to whom God in His infinite wisdom has given the control of the property interests of the country, and upon the successful Management of which so much depends.
Page 46 - Pray earnestly that right may triumph, always remembering that the Lord God Omnipotent still reigns, and that His reign is one of law and order, and not of violence and crime.
Page 87 - And earn for hungry mouths their need of bread. The Socialist is he who claims no more Than his own share from generous Nature's store; But that he asks, and asks, too, that no other Shall claim the share of any weaker brother, And brand him beggar in his own domain, To glut a mad, inordinate lust for gain. The Socialist is one who...
Page 35 - We must treat each man on his worth and merits as a man. We must see that each is given a square deal, because he is entitled to no more and should receive no less.
Page 47 - Reading, who in the great strike of 1902 assured the country that "the rights and interests of the laboring man will be protected and cared for, not by labor agitators, but by the Christian men to whom God has given the control of the property interests of the country.
Page 151 - Co., for the transportation from New York to Boston of peaches and other fruit shipped from Georgia points to Boston, its haul being part of the through service between the points of shipment and destination, is unreasonable and unjust and $50 per car would be a just and reasonable charge for such transportation.
Page 160 - The welfare of each of us is dependent fundamentally upon the welfare of all of us, and therefore in public life that man is the best representative of each of us who seeks to do good to each by doing good to all; in other words, whose endeavor it is, not to represent any special class and promote merely that class's selfish interests, but to represent all true and honest men of all sections...

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