Caleb's Crossing: A Novel

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Penguin, May 3, 2011 - Fiction - 336 pages
22 Reviews
A bestselling tale of passion and belief, magic and adventure from the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of March and The Secret Chord, coming from Viking in October 2015

 

Bethia Mayfield is a restless and curious young woman growing up in Martha's vineyard in the 1660s amid a small band of pioneering English Puritans. At age twelve, she meets Caleb, the young son of a chieftain, and the two forge a secret bond that draws each into the alien world of the other. Bethia's father is a Calvinist minister who seeks to convert the native Wampanoag, and Caleb becomes a prize in the contest between old ways and new, eventually becoming the first Native American graduate of Harvard College. Inspired by a true story and narrated by the irresistible Bethia, Caleb’s Crossing brilliantly captures the triumphs and turmoil of two brave, openhearted spirits who risk everything in a search for knowledge at a time of superstition and ignorance.




From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MaureenCean - LibraryThing

I really appreciate Brooks' devotion to accurately depicting the period she is writing about. She takes great pains with it, and I just had to abandon another novel because the author didn't make the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Amelia_Smith - LibraryThing

Bethia Mayfield, the narrator of this book, is a Calvinist, and at the beginning it's hard to relate to her worldview. I think that one of the biggest challenges of historical fiction is to create ... Read full review

All 19 reviews »

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About the author (2011)

Geraldine Brooks is the author of Year of Wonders and the nonfiction works Nine Parts of Desire and Foreign Correspondence. Previously, Brooks was a correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, stationed in Bosnia, Somalia, and the Middle East. END

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