The Trial

Front Cover
Modern Libr., 1937 - Criminals - 340 pages
15 Reviews
A terrifying psychological trip into the life of Joseph K., an ordinary man who wakes up one day to find himself accused of a crime he did not commit, a crime whose nature is never revealed to him. Once arrested, he is released, but must report to court on a regular basis--an event that proves maddening, as nothing is ever resolved. As he grows more uncertain of his fate, his personal life--including work at a bank and his relations with his landlady and a young woman who lives next door--becomes increasingly unpredictable. As K. tries to gain control, he succeeds only in accelerating his own excruciating downward spiral.
This edition contains extensive overviews for both the author and the novel.

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Review: The Trial

User Review  - Manny - Goodreads

The tortured bureaucratic world described in The Trial always strikes me as startlingly modern. I wondered How The Trial might have started if Kafka had been an academic writing in 2010 K's latest ... Read full review

Review: The Trial

User Review  - Bookworm Sean - Goodreads

Questions, questions, questions, I have so many questions. What is the trial? Is K actually guilty or is he innocent? Is this novel a nightmare sequence or a paranormal encountering? Why are so many ... Read full review

About the author (1937)

 Franz Kafka (3 July 1883 – 3 June 1924) was one of the major fiction writers of the 20th century. He was born to a middle-class German-speaking Jewish family in Prague, Austria-Hungary, presently the Czech Republic. His unique body of writing—much of which is incomplete and which was mainly published posthumously—is considered to be among the most influential in Western literature.


His stories, such as The Metamorphosis (1915), and novels, including The Trial (1925) and The Castle (1926), concern troubled individuals in a nightmarishly impersonal and bureaucratic world.

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