Privacy in Peril: How We Are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience

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Oxford University Press, Oct 25, 2007 - Social Science - 256 pages
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This probing account of the erosion of privacy in America shows that we are often unwitting, if willing, accomplices, providing personal data in exchange for security or convenience. The author shows that the personal data that we make available to virtually any organization for virtually any purpose is apt to surface elsewhere, applied to utterly different purposes. As long as we willingly accept the pursuit of profit or cutting government costs as sufficient reason for intensified scrutiny over our lives, then privacy will remain endangered.
 

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Contents

The Making of an Issue
1
Government Surveillance
39
Personal Data in the Marketplace Credit Insurance and Advertising
93
The Future of Privacy
143
Appendix
203
Notes
205
Bibliography
211
Index
217
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

James B. Rule is Distinguished Affiliated Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society at the University of California, Berkeley. A former fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, he is the author of Private Lives and Public Surveillance, a
winner of the C. Wright Mills Award. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, Washington Monthly, and The New York Times Book Review.

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