Luther on Education: Including a Historical Introduction, and a Translation of the Reformer's Two Most Important Educational Treatises

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Lutheran publication society, 1889 - Education - 274 pages
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Page 177 - Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations. Ask thy father, and he will show thee; thy elders, and they will tell thee.
Page 145 - I call therefore a complete and generous education that which fits a man to perform justly, skillfully, and magnanimously all the offices both private and public of peace and war.
Page 40 - Every man is free to embrace and profess the religion he shall believe true, guided by the light of reason.
Page 45 - ... permit the reading of the Bible, translated into the vulgar tongue by Catholic authors, to those persons whose faith and piety they apprehend will be augmented, and not injured by it, and this permission they must have in writing. But if any one shall have the presumption to read or possess it without such written permission, he shall not receive absolution until he have first delivered up such Bible to the ordinary.
Page 237 - Lord, that they which preach the gospel should live of the gospel : and forbiddeth the muzzling of the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn.
Page 71 - It being one chief project of that old deluder, Satan, to keep men from the knowledge of the Scriptures, as in former times, keeping them in an unknown tongue, so in these latter times, by persuading from the use of tongues...
Page 50 - But during the last three centuries, to stunt the growth of the human mind has been her chief object. Throughout Christendom, whatever advance has been made in knowledge, in freedom, in wealth, and in the arts of life, has been made in spite of her, and has everywhere been in inverse proportion to her power.
Page 96 - A mighty fortress is our God, a bulwark never failing; our helper he amid the flood of mortal ills prevailing. For still our ancient foe doth seek to work us woe; his craft and power are great, and armed with cruel hate on earth is not his equal.
Page 44 - Inasmuch as it. is manifest from experience, that if the Holy Bible, translated into the vulgar tongue, be indiscriminately allowed to every one, the temerity of men will cause more evil than good to arise from it, it is, on this point, referred to the judgment of the bishops or inquisitors, who may, by the advice of the priest or confessor, permit the reading of the Bible translated into the vulgar tongue...
Page 265 - The skill of the physician shall lift up his head: and in the sight of great men he shall be in admiration. The Lord hath created medicines out of the earth; and he that is wise will not abhor them.

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