The Visitor, or, Literary miscellany

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Page 323 - Ye ! who have traced the Pilgrim to the scene Which is his last, if in your memories dwell A thought which once was his, if on ye swell A single recollection, not in vain He wore his sandal-shoon and scallop-shell; Farewell ! with him alone may rest the pain, If such there were — with you, the moral of his strain.
Page 50 - THE turf shall be my fragrant shrine ; My temple, LORD ! that Arch of thine ; My censer's breath the mountain airs, And silent thoughts my only prayers...
Page 112 - The wisdom of a learned man cometh by opportunity of leisure: and he that hath little business shall become wise. How can he get wisdom that holdeth the plough, and that glorieth in the goad, that driveth oxen, and is occupied in their labours, and whose talk is of bullocks?
Page 304 - Sae true his heart, sae smooth his speech, His breath like caller air; His very foot has music in't As he comes up the stair. And will I see his face again? And will I hear him speak? I'm downright dizzy wi' the thought, In troth I'm like to greet!
Page 50 - There's nothing bright, above, below, From flowers that bloom to stars that glow, But in its light my soul can see Some feature of thy Deity...
Page 335 - The torch shall be extinguished which hath lit My midnight lamp — and what is writ, is writ ; — Would it were worthier ! but I am not now That which I have been — and my visions flit Less palpably before me — and the glow Which in my spirit dwelt is fluttering, faint, and low.
Page 94 - ... while yet nothing causes a greater expense of feeling. The heart is fretted and exhausted by being subjected to an alternation of contrary excitements, with the ultimate mortifying consciousness of their contributing to no end. The long-wavering deliberation, whether to perform some bold action of difficult virtue, has often cost more to feeling than the action itself, or a series of such actions, would have cost; with the great disadvantage, too, of...
Page 207 - By the apostle Paul, shadows to-night Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard, Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers, Armed in proof, and led by shallow Richmond.
Page 92 - ... as twigs and chips, floating near the edge of a river, are intercepted by every weed, and whirled in every little eddy.
Page 208 - Aeneas in her dreams appears, Disdainful as by day: she seems, alone, To wander, in her sleep, through ways unknown, Guideless and dark...

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