Kandide oder Die beste aller Welten

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tredition, 2012 - 140 pages
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Dieses Werk ist Teil der Buchreihe TREDITION CLASSICS. Der Verlag tredition aus Hamburg veröffentlicht in der Buchreihe TREDITION CLASSICS Werke aus mehr als zwei Jahrtausenden. Diese waren zu einem Großteil vergriffen oder nur noch antiquarisch erhältlich. Mit der Buchreihe TREDITION CLASSICS verfolgt tredition das Ziel, tausende Klassiker der Weltliteratur verschiedener Sprachen wieder als gedruckte Bücher zu verlegen - und das weltweit! Die Buchreihe dient zur Bewahrung der Literatur und Förderung der Kultur. Sie trägt so dazu bei, dass viele tausend Werke nicht in Vergessenheit geraten.
 

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
11
Section 3
15
Section 4
19
Section 5
23
Section 6
27
Section 7
29
Section 8
33
Section 18
73
Section 19
79
Section 20
85
Section 21
89
Section 22
91
Section 23
103
Section 24
105
Section 25
111

Section 9
37
Section 10
39
Section 11
43
Section 12
47
Section 13
53
Section 14
57
Section 15
61
Section 16
65
Section 17
69
Section 26
119
Section 27
123
Section 28
127
Section 29
131
Section 30
133
Section 31
138
Section 32
139
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

François-Marie Arouet known as Voltaire, was born in Paris in 1694. He was educated by the Jesuits at the Collège Louis-le-Grand (1704-1711), where he learned Latin and Greek; later in life he became fluent in Italian, Spanish, and English. By the time he left school, Voltaire had decided he wanted to be a writer. His father then obtained a job for him as a secretary to the French ambassador in the Netherlands. Most of Voltaire's early life revolved around Paris. From early on, Voltaire had trouble with the authorities for critiques of the government and religious intolerance. These activities were to result in two imprisonments and a temporary exile to England. The name "Voltaire", which the author adopted in 1718, is an anagram of "AROVET LI," the Latinized spelling of his surname, Arouet, and the initial letters of "le jeune" ("the young"). The name also echoes in reverse order the syllables of the name of a family château in the Poitou region: "Airvault". The adoption of the name "Voltaire" following his incarceration at the Bastille is seen by many to mark Voltaire's formal separation from his family and his past. Voltaire continued to write plays, such as Mérope (or La Mérope française) and began his long research into science and history. From 1762, he began to champion unjustly persecuted people, the case of Jean Calas being the most celebrated. This Huguenot merchant had been tortured to death in 1763, supposedly because he had murdered his son for wanting to convert to Catholicism. His possessions were confiscated and his remaining children were taken from his widow and were forced to become members of a monastery. Voltaire, seeing this as a clear case of religious persecution, managed to overturn the conviction in 1765. n February 1778, Voltaire returned for the first time in 20 years to Paris. He soon became ill again and died on 30 May 1778.

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