Jewel Sowers: A Novel

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Greening, 1903 - English fiction - 345 pages
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Page 347 - Bookman.—"A most interesting reprint of Butler's celebrated poem in a form which strikes us as being entirely appropriate. The size of page, type and margin are both delightful to the eye of a book lover, and pleasantly reminiscent of the little volumes of...
Page 347 - Messrs Greening here give us a most interesting reprint of Butler's celebrated poem in a form which strikes us as being entirely appropriate. The size of page, type and margin are both delightful to the eye of a book lover, and pleasantly reminiscent of the little volumes of the i/th century.
Page 344 - SOME PRESS OPINIONS Bookman.— "A political novel of decided interest, picturing modern society, political method and influences, a really great lady, and a young man who thinks. Mr Turner's style is bright, shrewd, and trenchant.
Page 341 - A brilliant piece of romance work." Mr AT QuiLLER-CoucH in the Daily News.— "A novel of uncommon merit ; an historical novel of a period rarely attempted by fiction." Observer. — " Mr Ranger-Gull possesses a brilliant imagination, original thought, and an able pen. His style is clear and forcible, and some of the passages in this, his latest story, are full of pathos." Daily Chronicle. — " Mr Ranger-Gull deserves the warmest praise, and willingly do we accord it. ... The story he has provided,...
Page 341 - The Hypocrite? "Back to Lilac Land,
Page 341 - Norman days struck a blow of vengeance and for freedom. lie pierced his lord with three arrows, one for each ravished daughter, and one for freedom, and after thrilling adventures expiates his crime by a death of the most frightful torture. There are so many powerful dramatic scenes in the story that I should think the advertised version of it for the stage...
Page 341 - Saturday Review.—" Full as it be of grim realism and ghastly tragedy, it is impossible not to read this book to the bitter end— bitter enough, in all conscience. . . . The book is without doubt a notable one. It is written in the true spirit of the times which it so eloquently describes.

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