The Mismeasure of Man

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1996 - Psychology - 444 pages
38 Reviews
When published in 1981, The Mismeasure of Man was immediately hailed as a masterwork, the ringing answer to those who would classify people, rank them according to their supposed genetic gifts and limits.

Yet the idea of biology as destiny dies hard, as witness the attention devoted to The Bell Curve, whose arguments are here so effectively anticipated and thoroughly undermined. In this edition, Stephen Jay Gould has written a substantial new introduction telling how and why he wrote the book and tracing the subsequent history of the controversy on innateness right through The Bell Curve. Further, he has added five essays on questions of The Bell Curve in particular and on race, racism, and biological determinism in general. These additions strengthen the book's claim to be, as Leo J. Kamin of Princeton University has said, "a major contribution toward deflating pseudo-biological 'explanations' of our present social woes."
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Paulagraph - LibraryThing

I found the Introduction to the Revised and Expanded Edition: "Thoughts at Age Fifteen" to be perhaps the most useful section of the book. In it, in addition to recapitulating his aims and his primary ... Read full review

Review: The Mismeasure of Man

User Review  - Keith - Goodreads

Mr Gould is a well known scientist author. In this book he demonstrates how many use statistics to prove a point with biased data and a biased outlook. He focuses on intelligence testing as a prime ... Read full review

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Contents

Acknowledgments
15
Reasons history and revision of The Mismeasure of Man
36
Introduction
51
monogenism
71
PaulBroca and the Heyday
105
Paul Broca and his school
114
Postscript
140
criminal anthropology
151
Factor Analysis
264
Charles Spearman and general intelligence
286
Cyril Burt and the hereditarian synthesis
303
A Positive Conclusion 557
351
Epilogue
365
Ghosts of Bell Curves past
379
Three Centuries Perspectives on Race
391
Racial geometry
401

Epilogue
173
An American
176
H H Goddard and the menace of the feebleminded
188
Terman and the mass marketing of innate IQ
204
IQ comes
222
The moral state of Tahitiand of Darwin
413
Bibliography
425
Index
433
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) was the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Geology at Harvard University. He published over twenty books, received the National Book and National Book Critics Circle Awards, and a MacArthur Fellowship.

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