Meditations

Front Cover
Penguin, 1964 - Conduct of life - 187 pages
34 Reviews
Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius wrote his famous "Meditations" during his campaigns against the barbarian invaders. Composed among the reeds and mists of the swampy Danube, his private journals record the passing thoughts, maxims, and musings on life and death of a sensitive and humble mind trained in the Stoic philosophy which, to a certain extent, anticipated the development of Christianity. Philosophy was both a religion and a guiding force for Marcus Aurelius. His is a transitional phase of thought in Stoic philosophy, where diffidence and willingness to recognize failure have replaced assurance and self-sufficiency. Instead of the Stoic virtue of pride Marcus Aurelius appears to anticipate Christian humility.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jmcdbooks - LibraryThing

Rated: F Oh, I tried. Night after night I would try to digest a few more random thoughts from this stoic Emperor of Rome. I'm not a stoic for sure. Finally gave up about 2/3 through the book. Very few ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Kurt.Rocourt - LibraryThing

The thing that keeps being repeated in this book is don't do bad. Maybe a sign of a guilty conscience, I don't know. It is the theme for this book in any case. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
THE HYMN OF CLEANTHES
29
TRANSLATORS NOTE
31
BOOK 1
35
BOOK 2
45
BOOK 3
53
BOOK 4
63
BOOK 5
77
BOOK 6
91
BOOK 7
105
BOOK 8
121
BOOK 9
137
BOOK 10
151
BOOK 11
165
BOOK 12
179
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About the author (1964)

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus was born to an upper-class Roman family in A.D. 121 and was later adopted by the future emperor Antoninus Pius, whom he succeeded in 161. His reign was marked by a successful campaign against Parthia, but was overshadowed in later years by plague, an abortive revolt in the eastern provinces, and the deaths of friends and family, including his co-emperor Lucius Verus. A student of philosophy from his earliest youth, he was especially influenced by the first-century Stoic thinker Epictetus. His later reputation rests on his Meditations, written during his later years and never meant for formal publication. He died in 180, while campaigning against the barbarian tribes on Rome's northern frontier.

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