A Book on Angling: Being a Complete Treatise on the Art of Angling in Every Branch (Google eBook)

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H. Jenkins limited, 1920 - Fishing - 364 pages
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Page 185 - Chesterfield, that, if a thing be worth doing at all, it is worth doing well, and we also quite agree with our gallant Colonel, however unfashionable the opinion, that more than half the pleasure of the chase consists in watching the hunting of well-broken dogs, and that it is nearly doubled if they chance to be of one's own breaking : the better the dog, the better the sport...
Page iii - Wilcocks's Sea-Fisherman: comprising the Chief Methods of Hook and Line Fishing in the British and other Seas, a glance at Nets, and remarks on Boats...
Page 193 - But, should you lure From his dark haunt beneath the tangled roots Of pendent trees the monarch of the brook, Behoves you then to ply your finest art. Long time he, following cautious, scans the fly, And oft attempts to seize it, but as oft The dimpled water speaks his jealous fear. At last, while haply o'er the shaded sun Passes a cloud, he desperate takes the death With sullen plunge.
Page 202 - No. 2 to 6, being well whipt to a strong silk-worm gut, with a shot or two a foot from it : put the point of the hook in at the head of the worm, out again a little lower than the middle, pushing it above the shank of the hook upon the gut; take a smaller one, beginning the same way, and bring...
Page 155 - S to be found in some seasons upon the Blythe, in Staffordshire ; but upon lake Tal-y-llyn, in North Wales, this insect is so numerous, on warm evenings, as to form clouds, settling upon the dress of a person passing by the lake (or upon any other object), where, in five or ten minutes, it changes its coat, leaving the old one upon the dress, etc., which, if of a dark colour, becomes spangled with seemingly white spots. The tail increases to quite four times its original length when this change takes...
Page 220 - Angling,' observes this gentleman, makes the remark that ' As the grayling is such a sporting fish, and so free to tise to all comers, it is a disgrace and a shame to treat him like a poacher, with worms and such abominations. Now, this may be all very well when you are dealing with the denizens of Hampshire or Derbyshire streams, where fly-fishing may be carried on almost into winter with reasonable expectation of success ; but anybody who pays a visit to any of our Yorkshire rivers after about...
Page 178 - Black Spider. — This is made with the small feather of the cock starling, dressed with brown silk. 2. The Red Spider is made with the small feather taken from the outside of the landrail's wing, dressed with yellow silk. 3. The Dun Spider is made from the small soft dun or ash-coloured feather taken from the outside of the dotterel's wing, failing that from the inside wing of the starling. The winged flies are as follows : — 1.
Page 74 - Smith cannot make a bait spin in that wonderful way, and cannot throw above twenty or thirty yards of line ; but somehow Smith, with a short line, runs more fish than our fast friend. It has been the popular myth that a bait travelling at railway pace, and spinning like one long line of silver, is the correct thing, because it imitates a fish in an agony of terror. This argument is sheer nonsense, as fish do not conduct themselves like dancing dervishes or ballet-masters, and perform pirouettes when...
Page 178 - The spiders are merely hankie flies, and are as follows : 1. The Black Spider. — This is made with the small feather of the cock starling, dressed with brown silk. 2. The Red Spider is made with the small feather taken from the outside of the landrail's wing, dressed with yellow silk. 3. The Dun Spider is made from the small soft dun or ash-coloured feather taken from the outeide of the dotterel's wing ; failing that, from the inside wing of the starling.
Page 253 - Tag, gold twist and golden-coloured floss ; tail, a topping, some teal, and tippet ; body, yellow, orange, and dark red (somewhat of a lake) pig's wool, broad gold tinsel ; hackle, dark red claret and light blue on the shoulder ; wing, a good lump of whitish tipped dark turkey, and strips of bustard, and gold pheasant tail over it, mixed with slices of blue, pale red, orange, and yellow swan ; head, black.

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