Introduction to Agricultural Engineering Technology: A Problem Solving Approach

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 5, 2007 - Technology & Engineering - 391 pages
2 Reviews

Introduction to Agricultural Engineering Technology: A problem Solving Approach is an invaluable text for agriculture students at the introductory level. The third edition has been thoroughly updated and reorganized to meet the current units and standards of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE).

The book aims to:

  • Familiarize students with a wide range of applications of engineering principles to agriculture
  • Discuss a selection of independent but related topics
  • Advance students’ problem solving abilities

Each chapter lists education objects, introductory material, and example problems where appropriate. In addition problems using ISO (metric) units, are now included.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

best book in my studies

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

When i read this book (Introduction to Agricultural Engineering ) Then i give review

Selected pages

Contents

Problem Solving
1
Significant Figures and Standard Form
17
Common Units of Measure
23
Simple Machines
36
Internal Combustion Engines
49
Power Trains
61
Tractors and Power Units
80
Machinery Calibration
93
Water Runoff
234
Erosion and Erosion Control
244
Irrigation
253
Handling Moisture Management and Storage of Biological Products
266
Animal Waste Management
279
Insulation and Heat Flow
286
Heating Ventilation and AirConditioning
293
Selection of Structural Members
319

Equipment Efficiency and Capacity
118
Economics of Agricultural Machinery
129
Sound and Noise
152
Measuring Distance
159
Angles and Areas
175
Land Description
196
Differential and Profile Leveling
204
Weather
221
Principles of Electricity
326
Series and Parallel Circuits
331
Sizing Conductors
340
Electric Motors
347
Appendices
356
Index
371
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Harry L. Field is an Associate Professor of Agricultural Mechanics in the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at Oklahoma State University.

John B. Solie is a Professor of Biomachinery in the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at Oklahoma State University.

Bibliographic information