Kazimir Malevich: The Climax of Disclosure

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Reaktion Books, 1991 - Art - 230 pages
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Malevich's sudden and startling realization of a non-objective way of painting – which he termed Suprematism – stands as a seminal moment in the history of twentieth-century art.

Rainer Crone and David Moos trace the artist's development from his beginnings in the Ukraine and early years in Moscow – where he was closely involved in the Futurist circle – through to the late 1920s and beyond. The authors of this book convincingly demonstrate that it is only through a close and sustained reading of Malevich's late – and still widely misunderstood – painterly oeuvre that his extraordinarily inventive stance can truly be comprehended.

Crone and Moos trace the close relationship between Malevich's practice and other contemporary non-political revolutions in physics, linguistics and poetry. They present Malevich as a uniquely creative artist, embodying in his work many of the insights and discoveries that define the twentieth century and the condition of modern life.
 

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Contents

A Critical Survey
28
Origins of a Painter
49
Interchanges
65
Passages Through Poetry 81
105
Subjectivity in Temporality
137
Late Sensations and the New Reality
161
The Free Imaginary Variation
185
Exhibitions
201
Bibliography
215
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About the author (1991)

Rainer Crone is Professor of Twentieth-century Art at the University of Munich. He has co-authored a number of publications with David Moos.

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