The Descendants of Nathaniel Clarke and His Wife Elizabeth Somerby of Newbury, Massachusetts: A History of Ten Generations, 1642-1902

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Priv. print. [T. R. Marvin & Son], 1902 - Massachusetts - 468 pages
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Page 172 - Report of the Board of Visitors to the United States Military Academy at West Point (1886). VTEL-QBIFFIN, v'e-lft
Page 126 - Westford, to serve in the Continental Army for the term of 3 years ; also, descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co., agreeable to resolve of Dec.
Page 220 - ... commandant at Fort Dummer during the Indian War, and whose youngest son, Timothy C. Dwight, was the first white child born in Vermont. William Cogswell Clarke was educated in the public schools of Manchester, at Philips Andover academy, and at Dartmouth college, from which he was graduated in 1876. He then entered the office of the Mirror and American and learned the printer's trade. In 1880 he removed to New York city and spent a portion of that year in acquiring a knowledge of the business...
Page 224 - The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Bridgeport, and by his versatility soon attracted the attention of his instructors.
Page 22 - To have full & free pardon & forgiveness of all my sins, & to inherit Everlasting life; And my Body I commit to...
Page 107 - Hill, and Glendale. In the last-named battle he was taken prisoner, but was soon exchanged and returned to duty. He participated in the battle of Bull Run, and on Nov. 29, 1862, was promoted to the rank of major-general of volunteers, succeeding General Hooker in command of the 1st Corps of the Army of the Potomac. On the first day of the battle of Gettysburg (July 1, 1863), he was in command of the left wing of the National army, and was shot dead. A monument in his honor was erected at Gettysburg...
Page 220 - Manchester, he entered the service of the daily Mirror and American as a local reporter, and later was promoted to be city editor, a position which he held for about eight years, conducting in the meantime several special departments for the daily and weekly editions of that newspaper. During these years he made the Horse Department of the Mirror a special feature, and to his efforts in this direction is due the high reputation which that paper justly holds among the horsemen of New England. This...
Page 222 - He was a member of the Manchester school board from 1884 to 1890. In 1891 he served as a representative from Ward 2 in the legislature, and was chairman of the committee on fisheries and game. In 1894 he was nominated by the Republicans of Manchester for the office of mayor, and was elected by a large majority, despite the fact that at the two preceding elections the Democratic candidate had been successful. He was reelected in 1896, again in 1898, and again in 1900, each time by a handsome plurality,...

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