Semantics: A Coursebook

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 19, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 361 pages
3 Reviews
This practical coursebook introduces all the basics of semantics in a simple, step-by-step fashion. Each unit includes short sections of explanation with examples, followed by stimulating practice exercises to complete in the book. Feedback and comment sections follow each exercise to enable students to monitor their progress. No previous background in semantics is assumed, as students begin by discovering the value and fascination of the subject and then move through all key topics in the field, including sense and reference, simple logic, word meaning and interpersonal meaning. New study guides and exercises have been added to the end of each unit to help reinforce and test learning. A completely new unit on non-literal language and metaphor, plus updates throughout the text significantly expand the scope of the original edition to bring it up-to-date with modern teaching of semantics for introductory courses in linguistics as well as intermediate students.
 

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Semantics is still a relatively new discipline. Scholars who want to venture and set their imprint in this discpline can benefit from reading this book for a start. This book offers an easy to understand illustration on what semantics is and how semantics is right into the nature of meaning and language itself.  

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Page 1 - I don't know what you mean by 'glory,' " Alice said. Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. "Of course you don't — till I tell you. I meant 'there's a nice knock-down argument for you!
Page 1 - When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean— neither more nor less." "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things." "The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master— that's all.
Page 1 - I thought it looked a little queer. As I was saying, that SEEMS to be done right — though I haven't time to look it over thoroughly just now — and that shows that there are three hundred and sixty-four days when you might get un-birthday presents — ' 'Certainly,' said Alice. And only ONE for birthday presents, you know. There's glory for you!' 'I don't know what you mean by "glory,'

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About the author (2007)

James R. Hurford is Professor of General Linguistics, University of Edinburgh.

Brendan Heasley is Consultant (Postgraduate Training), Sharjah Women's College, United Arab Emirates.

Michael B. Smith is Associate Professor of Linguistics, Oakland University.

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