Alphabet of Botany, for the Use of Beginners

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P. Hill, 1833 - Botany - 149 pages
 

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Page 11 - Soft roll your incense, herbs, and fruits, and flowers, In mingled clouds to him whose sun exalts, Whose breath perfumes you, and whose pencil paints.
Page 25 - ... of several parts, the body, the crown or collar, the branches and the fibres, which latter seem indispensable in all plants. The most essential part of every root is the crown, which is the portion of the plant between the stem or leaves, and the body of the root. In many plants of a hardy nature nearly the whole of the body of the root may be cut away, and yet, if the crown be uninjured, still the plant will flourish, but in the generality of plants, if the crown be injured, no matter how perfect...
Page 134 - Thus the olive may live three hundred years, the oak double that number ; the chestnut is said to have lasted for nine hundred and fifty years; the dragon's-blood tree of Teneriffe may be two thousand years old ; and Adanson mentions banians six thousand years old. When the wood of the interior ceases to afford room by the closeness of its texture for the passage of sap or pulp, or the formation of new vessels, it dies, and by all its moisture...
Page 134 - ... tree of Teneriffe may be two thousand years old ; and Adanson mentions banians six thousand years old. When the wood of the interior ceases to afford room by the closeness of its texture for the passage of sap or pulp, or the formation of new vessels, it dies, and by all its moisture passing off into the younger wood, the fibres shrink, and are ultimately reduced to dust-.
Page 134 - Teneriffe may be two thousand years old ; and Adanson mentions banians six thousand years old. When the wood of the interior ceases to afford room, by the closeness of its texture, for the passage of sap or pulp, or the formation of new vessels, it dies, and by all its moisture passing off into the younger wood, the fibres shrink, and are ultimately reduced to dust. The centre of the tree thus becomes dead, while the outer portion ' continues to live, and in this way trees may exist for many years...
Page 133 - AGE OF PLANTS. SOME plants, such as the minute funguses, termed mould, only live a few hours, or at most a few days. Mosses, for the most part, live only one season, as do the garden plants called annuals, which die of old age as soon as they ripen their seeds. Some again, as the foxglove and the hollyhock, live for two years, occasionally prolonged to three, if their flowering be prevented. Trees again, planted in a suitable soil and situation, live for centuries. Thus the...
Page 12 - Every accented penultimate vowel is pronounced long, when followed by a vowel or a single consonant, as...
Page 136 - Bell-form. Campes'tris. Growing in uncultivated fields. Canes'cent. White or hoary. Cap'illary. Hair-form. Cap'itate. Growing in heads. Cap'sule. A little chest; that kind of hollow seed-vessel which becomes dry and opens when ripe ; a capsule that never opens it called a samara. Cari'na. The keel or lower folded petal of a papilionaceous flower. Car'i'nated. Keeled, having a sharp back like the keel of a vessel. Carno'se. Of a fleshy consistence.
Page 113 - ... well as in a garden. It is found, however, that they do not thrive unless the water is regularly changed, indicating that it is not the water alone, but something in the water which becomes exhausted.
Page 3 - This work is intended as a series of exercises in reading for the younger classes of our common schools, preparatory to the use of the National Reader.' different classes in the same school.

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