Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe

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Doubleday, 1966 - Fiction - 821 pages
549 Reviews

This single volume brings together all of Poe's stories and poems, and illuminates the diverse and multifaceted genius of one of the greatest and most influential figures in American literary history.

 

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5 stars
357
4 stars
119
3 stars
56
2 stars
12
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5

A good compendium from the MAster - Goodreads
Poe is unique, but some of his writing seems overdone. - Goodreads
Stunning use of visual imagery. - Goodreads
I've loved Edgar Allen Poe's writing for a while. - Goodreads
such an amazing writer. - Goodreads
the best horror writer ever! - Goodreads

Review: The Complete Stories and Poems (The Works of Edgar Allan Poe)

User Review  - Aaron White - Goodreads

The vast majority of Poe's writing is excruciatingly boring. It doesn't help that I can't read the French and Latin phrases that he inserts and that I am not well read enough to understand many of his ... Read full review

Review: The Complete Stories and Poems (The Works of Edgar Allan Poe)

User Review  - Alex - Goodreads

reading poe is like looking threw your window on a dark, snowy night. Read full review

All 154 reviews »

Contents

The Murders in the Rue Morgue
2
The Mystery of Marie Rogfit
27
The Black Cat
63
The GoldBug
70
Ligeia
97
A Descent into the MaelstrSm
108
The Telltale Heart
121
The Assignation
139
The Man that Was Used Up
350
Diddling
358
The Angel of the Odd
366
Mellonta Tauta
373
The ThousandandSecond Tale of Scheherazade
383
Xing a Paragrab
397
A Tale of Jerusalem
409
Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling
415

MS Found in a Bottle
148
William Wilson
156
Berenice
171
The Fall of the House of Usher
177
The Cask of Amontillado
191
A Tale of the Ragged Mountains
207
The Man of the Crowd
215
Morella
222
The Oblong Box
237
The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion
245
The Masque of the Red Death
256
The Imp of the Perverse
271
The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether
292
The Literary Life of Thingum Bob Esq
305
How to Write a Blackwood Article
320
A Predicament
328
Mystification
335
Loss of Breath
341
The Due De LOmelette
432
The Devil in the Belfry
440
Lionizing
446
The Spectacles
462
Four Beasts in One
480
Never Bet the Devil Your Head
486
The BalloonHoax
496
Mesmeric Revelation
505
Annabel Lee
738
Dreamland
751
ToF
753
Eldorado
767
Romance
781
Hymn to Aristogeiton and Harmodius
794
A Pajan
809
Edgar Allan PoeA Biographical Note
816
Copyright

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About the author (1966)

There has never been any doubt about Poe's enormous literary significance, but, with regard to his ultimate artistic merit, there has been considerable disagreement. To some he is little more than a successful charlatan, whose literary performances are only a virtuoso's display of stunning, but finally shallow, effects. Others, however, are struck by Poe's profound probing of the human psyche, his philosophical sophistication, and his revolutionary attitude toward literary language. No doubt both sides of this argument are in part true in their assessments. Poe's work is very uneven, sometimes reaching great literary heights, at other times striking the honest reader as meaningless, pathetic, or simply wrong-headed. This is not surprising, considering the personal turmoil that characterized so much of Poe's short life. Poe was extreme in his literary views and practices; balance and equilibrium were not literary values that he prized. Scorning the didactic element in poetry, Poe sought to separate beauty from morality. In his best poems, such as "The City in the Sea" (1836), he achieved an intensification of sound sufficient to threaten the common sense of the poetic line and release a buried, even a morbid, sense that would enchant the reader by the sonic pitch of the poem. Defining poetry as "the rhythmic creation of beauty," Poe not only sought the dream buried beneath the poetic vision---Coleridge had already done that---but also abandoned the moral rationale that gave the buried dream symbolic meaning. The dream, or nightmare, was itself the content of the verse. Some readers, however, such as T. S. Eliot, have found Poe's poetry extremely limited, both in its content and in its technique. While it is true that Poe was one of the few American poets to achieve international fame during the nineteenth century, critics point out that his influence on such literary movements as French symbolism and literary modernism was largely through the superb translations and criticisms of his writings by Baudelaire (see Vol. 2), Mallarme (see Vol. 2), and Valery (see Vol. 2). Poe's theory of the short story, as well as his own achievements in that genre, contributed substantially to the development of the modern short story, in Europe as well as in the United States. Poe himself regarded his talent for fiction writing as of less importance than his poetry and criticism. His public preferred his detective stories, such as "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" (1841), "The Mystery of Marie Roget" (1842--1843) and "The Gold Bug" (1843); and his analytic tales, such as "A Descent into the Maelstrom" (1841), "The Black Cat" (1843), and "The Premature Burial" (1844). His own preference, however, was for the works of the imagination, such as "Ligeia" (1838), "The Fall of the House of Usher" (1839), and "The Masque of the Red Death" (1842), tales of horror beyond that of the plausible kind found in the analytic stories. Just as with his poetry, however, readers have been strongly divided in their appreciation of the deeper worth of Poe's fiction. For many, they are at best merely an effective display in Gothicism, good horror stories, an enjoyable experience in vicarious terror, but nothing more. This was the view of Henry James, that other great nineteenth-century master of the ghost story, who claimed that "an enthusiasm for Poe is the mark of a decidedly primitive stage of reflection." But others have found in these carefully crafted pieces something far more profound, a way of seeing into our unconscious, that place where, for a while at least, terrifying conflicts coexist. As Poe so well put it himself in the preface to his Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (1840), "If in many of my productions terror has been the basis, I maintain that terror is not of Germany but of the soul.

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