Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico

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Jocelyn H. Olcott, Mary Kay Vaughan, Gabriela Cano
Duke University Press, 2006 - History - 320 pages
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Sex in Revolution challenges the prevailing narratives of the Mexican Revolution and postrevolutionary state formation by placing women at center stage. Bringing to bear decades of feminist scholarship and cultural approaches to Mexican history, the essays in this book demonstrate how women seized opportunities created by modernization efforts and revolutionary upheaval to challenge conventions of sexuality, work, family life, religious practices, and civil rights.

Concentrating on episodes and phenomena that occurred between 1915 and 1950, the contributors deftly render experiences ranging from those of a transgendered Zapatista soldier to upright damas católicas and Mexico City’s chicas modernas pilloried by the press and male students. Women refashioned their lives by seeking relief from bad marriages through divorce courts and preparing for new employment opportunities through vocational education. Activists ranging from Catholics to Communists mobilized for political and social rights. Although forced to compromise in the face of fierce opposition, these women made an indelible imprint on postrevolutionary society.

These essays illuminate emerging practices of femininity and masculinity, stressing the formation of subjectivity through civil-society mobilizations, spectatorship and entertainment, and locales such as workplaces, schools, churches, and homes. The volume’s epilogue examines how second-wave feminism catalyzed this revolutionary legacy, sparking widespread, more radically egalitarian rural women’s organizing in the wake of late-twentieth-century democratization campaigns. The conclusion considers the Mexican experience alongside those of other postrevolutionary societies, offering a critical comparative perspective.

Contributors. Ann S. Blum, Kristina A. Boylan, Gabriela Cano, María Teresa Fernández Aceves, Heather Fowler-Salamini, Susan Gauss, Temma Kaplan, Carlos Monsiváis, Jocelyn Olcott, Anne Rubenstein, Patience Schell, Stephanie Smith, Lynn Stephen, Julia Tuñón, Mary Kay Vaughan

 

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Contents

Amelio Robless Transgender Masculinity in the Mexican Revolution
Modern Women and Their Enemies Mexico City 1924
Film Representation by Emilio El Indio Fernández
Reshaping the Domestic Sphere
Divorce and Revolutionary State Formation in Yucatán
Gender Class and Anxiety at the Gabriela Mistral Vocational School Revolutionary Mexico City
6
Adoption and Public Welfare Mexico City 19381942
22
The Gendered Realm of Labor Organizing
40
Gender and Industrial Modernization in the Textile Industry in Postrevolutionary Puebla
76
Women and Revolutionary Politics
92
Mexican Catholic Womens Activism 19171940
94
Women on Mexicos Popular Front
13
Reframing the Nation from Below
13
Gender Chaos and Authority in Revolutionary Times
13
Bibliography
13
Contributors
13

The Struggle between the Metate and the Molinos de Nixtamal in Guadalajara 19201940
42
Gender Work Trade Unionism and WorkingClass Womens Culture in PostRevolutionary Veracruz
57

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Page 13 - Aguilar fue comisionado oficialmente por el Primer Jefe del Ejército Constitucionalista, Encargado del Poder Ejecutivo de la Nación...
Page 13 - French, John D., and Daniel James, eds. 1997. The Gendered Worlds of Latin American Women Workers: From Household and Factory to the Union Hall and Ballot Box. Durham: Duke University Press.

About the author (2006)

Jocelyn Olcott is the Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor of History at Duke University. She is the author of Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico, also published by Duke University Press.

Mary Kay Vaughan is Professor of History at University of Maryland. Her authored books include CULTURAL POLITICS IN REVOLUTION: TEACHERS,

PEASANTS, AND SCHOOLS IN MEXICO, 1934-1940 (1997) and THE STATE,

EDUCATION, AND SOCIAL CLASS IN MEXICO, 1880-1928 (1982). Her edited

works include (w/ Stephen E. Lewis) THE EAGLE AND THE VIRGIN: NATION

AND CULTURAL REVOLUTION IN MEXICO, 1920-1940 (Duke, 2005) and (w/

Heather Fowler Salamini) CREATING SPACES, SHAPING

TRANSITIONS: WOMEN OF THE MEXICAN COUNTRYSIDE, 1850-1990 (1994).

Jocelyn Olcott is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Duke

University. She is the author of REVOLUTIONARY WOMEN IN

POSTREVOLUTIONARY MEXICO (Duke, 2005).

Gabriela Cano is Professor in the Depto. de Filosofía Historia at the

Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico. She is the author of CUATRO

ESTUDIOS DE GENERO EN EL MEXICO URBANO DEL SIGLO XIX (2001) and

(w/ Verena Radkau) GANANDO ESPACIOS: HISTORIAS DE VIDA: GUADALUPE

ZUNIGA, ALURA FLORES Y JOSEFINA VICENS, 1920-1940 (1989).

Gabriela Cano is Professor of History at Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana in Mexico City. She is a coeditor of the multivolume Historia de las mujeres en España y América Latina.

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