Original Treatises: Dating from the XIIth to XVIIIth Centuries on the Arts of Painting, in Oil, Miniature, Mosaic, and on Glass; of Gilding, Dyeing, and the Preparation of Colours and Artificial Gems; Preceded by a General Introduction; with Translations, Prefaces, and Notes, Volume 1

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J. Murray, 1849 - Painting - 321 pages
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Page 6 - ... the flame of alcohol ; and Volta ascertained that the gas emitted is a composition of carbon and hydrogen — probably produced by the decomposition of vegetable remains in the subjacent sand-rock. Between Monte Bene and Montoggioli is a singular spring, which is frequently dry. If a lighted match be brought near the mud of this spring, the gases exhaled from it immediately take fire, burning with a lambent...
Page 133 - Tria sunt folii genera ; unum purpureum, aliud rubeum, turcium saphirum que sic temperabis. Tolle cineres et crebra eos per pannum ; Perfondes eos aqua frigida fac inde tortulas ad similitudinem panis mittes que ea in igne donee omnino candescant. Postquam diutissime canduerint et postea friguerint mitte partem in vas fictile perfunde urina, move ligno, cum que residerent lucide perfunde rubeum folium et teres illud modice super lapidem addens ei quartam partem vivae calcis, et cum tritum fuerit,...
Page ccliv - The amber-tree of the former world (Pinites succifer) had a richness in resin with which none of the coniferous tribes of the present world will bear comparison, inasmuch as great masses of amber are contained not only within and upon the bark, but also between the rings of the wood, and in the direction of the medullary rays, which, as well as the cells, are seen under the microscope to be filled with ambreous resin, of a whiter or yellower colour in different places. Amongst the vegetable matters...
Page xxv - In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the houses of the English, of the middle and lower classes, consisted in general of a ground-floor only, divided into two apartments, namely, a hall, into which the principal door opened, and which was the room for cooking, eating, and receiving visitors ; and a chamber adjoining the hall, and opening out of it, which was the private apartment of the females of the family and the bed1 See the First and Second Reports of the Commissioners of Fine Arts.
Page lvii - Tarsiatura." This consisted in representing houses and perspective views of buildings by inlaying pieces of wood of various colours and shades into panels of walnut wood. Vasari 2 says, that at first this kind of work was executed in white and black only; but Fra Giovanni Veronese, who practised it extensively, much improved the art by staining the wood with various colours by means of waters and tints boiled with penetrating oil, in order to produce both light and shadow, with wood of various colours,...
Page 232 - ... or wine, or cervisia, when they are mixed or tempered. XXIX. [260] How oil is prepared for tempering colours. — Put a moderate quantity of lime into oil and heat it, continually scumming it ; add ceruse to it according to the quantity of oil, and put it in the sun for a month or more, stirring it frequently. And know that the longer it remains in the sun, the better it will be. Then strain and keep it, and distemper the colours with it.
Page clxxiv - Trattato, cap. xl. wood or verzino. The third description was composed of a mixture of the first and second kinds of lake. Kermes or Grana. — The dead bodies of the female insect of the coccus ilicis, which lives upon the leaves of the prickly oak. It appears to have been known from the time of Moses, and has been employed from an early period in India to dye silk. It was called by the Greeks coccus baphica, by the Latins granum infectorium, by Pliny coccigranum, by the Arabs charmen, kermes, and...
Page xviii - There were no wooden-handled knives, nor more than one or two drinking cups, in. a house. Candles of wax or tallow were unknown ; a servant held a torch during supper. The clothes of men were of leather unlined : scarcely any gold or silver was seen on their dress. The common...
Page lii - Da lib. di am. dell' an. 1301 st. pis. dell' opera del Duomo di Pisa. " Libras quinquaginta quatuor et solidos decem et octo den. pisanorum minutorum pro pretio centinarum quatuor olei linseminis ad operam Ma* By a " Majesty " or " Maesta," is meant a representation of the Virgin or Saviour enthroned. See Mr. Eastlake's ' Materials,

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