A biographical dictionary of eminent Scotsmen

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Blackie, 1854
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Page 293 - at first laughed at me, but when I explained my meaning to him, he encouraged me to go on ; and, that I might make fair copies in the daytime of what I had done in the night, he often worked for me himself. I shall always have a respect for the memory of that man.
Page 167 - I find there are many good men among us ; for my own part, I have had full confidence of all in this ship ; and once more beg to express my approbation of your conduct. " May God, who has thus far conducted you, continue to do so ; and may the British navy, the glory and support of our country, be restored to its wonted splendour, and be not only the bulwark of Britain, but the terror of the world. " But this can only be effected by a strict adherence to our duty and obedience ; and let us pray that...
Page 154 - Voice which did thy sounds approve Which wont in such harmonious strains to flow, Is reft from Earth to tune those spheres above, What art thou but a harbinger of woe? Thy pleasing notes be pleasing notes no more, But orphans...
Page 383 - Including their Church and State, the Reorganization of the Inquisition, the Rise, Progress, and Consolidation of the Jesuits, and the means taken to effect the Counter-reformation in Germany, to revive Romanism in France, and to suppress Protestant Principles in the South of Europe. Translated from the last edition of the German by WALTER K. KELLY, of Trinity College, Dublin. " This translation of Ranke we consider to be very superior to any other in the English language.
Page 166 - To be deserted by my fleet in the face of an enemy, is a disgrace which I believe never before happened to a British admiral; nor could I have supposed it possible. My greatest comfort under God is, that I have been supported by the officers, seamen, and marines, of this ship ; for which, with a heart overflowing with gratitude, I request you to accept my sincere thanks.
Page 240 - I protest before God and your lordships, that I profess and allow with my heart the true religion presently professed within this realm, and authorized by the laws thereof ; I shall abide thereat, and defend the same to my life's end, renouncing the Roman religion called papistry.
Page 293 - ... length, between my eye and the stars ; sliding the beads upon it till they hid such and such stars from my eye, in order to take their apparent distances from one another; and then, laying the thread down on a paper, I marked the stars thereon by the beads...
Page 377 - Bible. The Holy Bible, containing the Old and New Testaments, according to the Authorized Version; arranged in Paragraphs and Parallelisms...
Page 60 - His unusual dress and figure, when he was in London, never failed to draw after him a great crowd of boys, and other young people, who constantly attended at his lodgings, and followed him with huzzas, as he went to court, or returned from it. As he was a man of humour, he would always thank them for their civilities, when he left them at the door, to go in to the king ; and would let them know exactly at what hour he intended to come out again, and return to his lodgings...
Page 59 - He was bred up very hardy from his youth, both in diet and clothing. He never wore boots, nor above one coat, which was close to his body, with close sleeves, like those we call jockey coats.

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