History of California, Volume 1

Front Cover
N. J. Stone, 1897 - California
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Interesting book. There are several pages missing - pp. 764-775 and 784-785, and some repeated pages in the same section.

Contents

Voyages to and conquest of the Philippines
82
Attempts to find a way homeward to the north of America return south
88
Conduct of the Indians towards the English
94
Cavendishs passage across the Pacific return to England and subsequent fate
100
Passage to Cape San Lucas and capture of a Philippine galleon
105
CHAPTER XI
112
Passage to and stay at Cape San Lucas
118
CHAPTER XII
125
Voyage of the San Agustin and its shipwreck
131
CHAPTER XIII
137
Stories of a people resembling the Spaniards in the Interior
139
Viscainos project for a third voyage retirement recall and death
146
Voyages of Ortega and Carboneli
152
Removal of the settlement to San Bruno
158
Tender of the province to the Society of Jesus and its refusal
164
Second voyage of Viscaino passage to San Diego and intercourse with
169
Progress of the spiritual conquest opposition of the medicine men or sor
175
Foundation of the mission of San Francisco Xavier
181
His fourth journey subsequent labors and death
187
CHAPTER V
194
Campaign against the insurgents trial and execution of the ringleader
195
Dawning of brighter days foundation of the new missions of Juan Bautista
201
Was the missionary government beneficial to the natives?
207
Proposed purchase of California and its rejection instructions to the viceroy
213
CHAPTER VIII
219
Foundation of the mission of La Purlsima Conception
223
Foundation of the mission of San Ignacio and attack upon it by the natives
229
Murder of Carranco and outrages at Santiago
236
A second Philippine galleon at San Lucas murder of its boats crew
242
Voyage of Consag up the gulf
248
How they were driven out of Sinaloa and Sonora
252
Baegert and his Nachrichten
258
Quadrupeds birds reptiles and insects
264
Sexual relations parturition maternal affection
272
Their limited numerals cunning thievery idleness and filth their sound
278
Domestic animals and uses made of them
283
The spirit in which and objects for which they labored
289
His visit to the Holy Land increased ardor and impression of the stigmata 294 How his order of Franciscans originated its rapid rise and wide extent 2...
296
His journey on foot from Vera Cruz to Mexico
302
Preparations and dispatch of the San Antonio
309
Voyages of ihe San Carlos and San Antonio
315
Withdrawal of Jose de Galvez the visitadorgeneral 512
317
Juniperos experience in making converts
321
How it advanced to San Francisco and returned and still failed to find Mon
327
Rejoicings in Mexico
334
SAN ANTONIO SAN GABRIEL AND SAN LUIS OBISPO Page
339
Foundation of the mission of Guadalupe 222
344
Failure of supplies and how remedied slaughter of bears
345
Political changes in Mexico the viceroyalty recall of the visitadorgencral
351
Resolutions in reference to powers to be exercised by the missionaries
357
His expedition from Altar to Monterey
363
Junlperos arrival at Monterey
366
March of Rivera y Moncada and Anza to the spot
372
How the stratagem of a San Gabriel Indian saved him from destruction
378
What St Francis had to do with the discovery
385
Angel Island and Ayalas camp there
391
Anzas survey of San Francisco and the bay
395
How the San Carlos arrived and the work at the presidio and mission pro
401
Foundation of Santa Barbara mission
457
THE PIONEERS OF 1769
463
His summing up of impressions Indians slaves
469
Brancifortes participation in the new projects
476
Progress of the new establishment
479
Strange actions of Father Concepcion
482
Lasuens return after his labors to Monterey Ms pious sweats
488
Presidents Jose Scñan and Mariano Payeras foundation and site of San
494
General character of the old establishments churches and buildings court
500
Progress of the establishment 456
507
Pedro Fages and his quarrels with the missionaries
513
Exhibition of Rivera y Moncadas ill humor towards Anza
519
His legislation
525
His raid upon licentiousness general immorality and faultfinding
531
Fages improvements at Monterey how he employed Indians to do the work
537
Circuitous manner in which royal orders were transmitted to California
541
Death of Romeu respect paid to his family
547
New missions founded by the Dominicans in Lower California
553
Journey of the governor and his family to Monterey good humor and gal
559
Reforms promised by the missionaries and Boricas manly letter on the sub
565
Fernandez experiences of the usual fate of a good man in a bad age
567
Talk of war with England rumored invasion by Americans pronounced
573
The Plan of Pitic its object and character
579
Establishment of el rancho del rey opposition of the missionaries Borica
586
The bad materials he had to work apon his crusade against aguardiente
590
Character of early school teachers
596
Recognition and appreciation of his great services by the viceroy Branciforte
603
Arrillagas change of residence from Loreto to Monterey
610
Progress of San Jose the alameda
616
The British ship Raccoon at San Francisco Captain Blacks correspondence
622
Accession of Fernando VII to the Spanish throne and how allegiance
628
Description of the presidio of Monterey where the festivities took place
634
Combat between bull and bear
638
How the captain of the strange vessel was obliged to give an account
644
Disposition of the California forces for the purposes of resistance
650
How the insurgents attempted to take a treasure ship near San Bias
657
Sudden success of the Mexican revolution Iturbide and his Plan of Iguala
663
More trouble from insurgents anticipated and what was done
664
Cooks voyages and search for a northern passage
670
Fate of La PeYouse
676
Vessels seized by the Spaniards
683
How England put its own interpretation upon it
689
Revival of old stories about the Straits ol Anian
690
Kendrick and Grays voyages in the ship Columbia and sloop Washington
696
Importance of the discovery of the Columbia Grays claims to credit
702
The British possessions on the northwest coast
708
Their journey to the Rocky mountains
714
Johm Jacob A nors projects
720
CHAPTER XII
728
Instances of Indian acuteness and strength of mind
734
Demands for emancipation
740
CHAPTER XIII
746
Attributes and worship of Chinigchinich
752
The puplem or grand council ceremonies upon commencing harvests
758
Descriptions of various dances
764
INDIAN DOMESTIC RELATIONS AND MODES OF LIFE
770
Differences of customs in different places maternal affection
776
Weapons bows and arrows
783

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Page 52 - Know that on the right hand of the Indies there is an island called California, very close to the side of the Terrestrial Paradise; and it was peopled by black, women, without any man among them, for they lived in the fashion of Amazons.
Page 95 - ... of man: infinite was the company of very large and fat Deere which there we sawe by thousands, as we supposed, in a heard; besides a multitude of a strange kinde of Conies, by farre exceeding them in number: their heads and bodies, in which they resemble other Conies, are but small; his tayle, like the tayle of a Rat, exceeding long; and his feet like the pawes of a Want or moale...
Page 42 - ... que todos los que tienen alguna ciencia y experiencia en la navegación de las Indias han tenido por muy cierto que descubriendo por estas partes la mar del Sur se habían de hallar muchas islas ricas de oro y perlas y piedras preciosas y especería, y se habían de descubrir y hallar otros muchos secretos y cosas admirables; y esto han afirmado y afirman también personas de letras y experimentadas en la ciencia de la cosmografía.
Page 263 - Bengal and the Canary Islands. The sky is constantly serene and of a deep blue, and without a cloud ; and should any clouds appear for a moment at the setting of the sun, they display the most beautiful shades of violet, purple, and green.
Page 624 - She was lively and animated, had sparkling, love-inspiring eyes, beautiful teeth, pleasing and expressive features, a fine form, and a thousand other charms; yet her manners were perfectly simple and artless!
Page 141 - I believe,' says Father Torquemanda, 'that the devil was in those crows and spoke through them, for they were regarded with great respect and veneration;' and in further illustration of this he relates that on another occasion, when several Indian women were washing fish upon the beach, the crows approached and snatched the food from their hands; and that the women stood in such awe that they dared not drive them away, and were horrified when the Spaniards threw stones at them."** To quote further,...
Page 155 - Those of California are of a very beautiful water and large ; but they are frequently of an irregular figure, disagreeable to the eye. The shell which produces the pearl is particularly to be found in the Bay of Ceralvo, and round the islands of Santa Cruz and San Jose. The most valuable pearls in the posses*VOL, n.
Page 640 - Indians who had assisted in the mass of the morning and the bull and bear fight of the afternoon furnished the music for the dances; and they did it well, being much more accustomed even for their church music to lively and inspiriting operatic airs and dancing tunes than to slow and lugubrious elegies and dirges. The programme consisted of contradan^as, minuets, Aragonese jotas, and various other dances usual among the Spanish population. It was the custom to accompany the dancing with the singing...
Page 102 - I navigated along the coast of Chili, Peru, and New Spain, where I made great spoils. I burnt and sunk nineteen sail of ships, small and great. All the villages and towns that ever I landed at, I burned and spoiled. And had I not been discovered upon the coast, I had taken great quantity of treasure. The matter of most profit to me was a great ship of the king's, which I took at California,
Page 87 - Hereupon, the man, being influenced with ambition of glory and hopes of wealth, was so vehemently transported with desire to navigate that sea, that falling down there upon his knees, he implored the Divine assistance that he might, at some time or other, sail thither and make a perfect discovery of the same ; and hereunto he bound himself with a vow.

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